quahog

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Related to Quahogs: quahaug, Hard clam, Littleneck clams

quahog

Medtalk A derogatory regionalism for an obese, pregnant, unkempt, malodorous, socially/economically disadvantaged ♀. See Gomer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shellfish harvested in the fall incorporated more nitrogen, which Reitsma said wasn't a surprise, since oysters and quahogs tend to "fatten up" in the fall in preparation for the winter season.
Occan quahogs inhabit sandy, muddy, and gravelly sediments on the continental shelf, and are commonly found at depths of 25-80 m (Morton 2011), tolerating bottom temperatures up to 16[degrees]C and a salinity range between 22 and 35 PSU (Schone 2013).
Quahogs Must Be Delivered In Half Or Full Bushel Amounts Within The Annually Permitted Time Period (april 15th Thru October 31st).
The goal of the present study was to examine, using video-endoscopy, the time-and density-dependent in vivo response of adult northern quahogs, M.
4) The selectmen could issue permits to "bed" quahogs on private leases, that had:
Prior to the negotiation period, there were some vessels that were licensed to harvest surf clams and ocean quahogs but they were not actively utilized; the vessel owners' expectation of a future property right created the incentive to harvest with those vessels in order to establish a historical record of harvests.
Approximately 270,000 pounds of surf clams and 300,000 pounds of quahogs are processed per day.
Pacific geoducks and Atlantic quahogs are estimated to live up to 146 and 221 years, respectively.
80) Before offloading,(81) all cages that contain surf clams or ocean quahogs must be tagged with these cage tags, which are then collected by the Regional Director.
By the time NMFS imposed ITQs on quahogs and surf clams in 1990, overfishing had forced the feds to restrict harvesting to six hours every two weeks.
and in September closed its Quahogs restaurant in Warwick, R.
John is widely recognized and respected for his work on shellfish, particularly hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria, aka northern quahogs among the strict New Englanders), and this is best embodied in another great effort with Mike Castagna: "The Biology of the Hard Clam" (Kraeuter & Castagna 2001).