coumarin

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coumarin

 [koo´mah-rin]
1. a principle extracted from the tonka bean, from which several anticoagulants are derived that inhibit hepatic synthesis of vitamin K–dependent coagulation factors.
2. any of these derivatives.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cou·ma·rin

(kū'mă-rin),
1. A general descriptive term applied to anticoagulants and other drugs derived from dicumarol, a component of the Tonka bean.
2. A fragrant neutral principle obtained from the Tonka bean, Dypterix odorata, and made synthetically from salicylic aldehyde; it is used to disguise unpleasant odors.
[coumarou, native name of Tonka bean]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coumarin

(ko͞o′mər-ĭn)
n.
A fragrant crystalline compound, C9H6O2, present in tonka beans and produced synthetically for use as a fragrance. Coumarin has been banned as a food additive in the United States because it can be toxic in large amounts.

cou′ma·ric (-mər-ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cou·ma·rin

(kū'mă-rin)
Fragrant neutral principle obtained from the Tonka bean, Dypterix odorata, and also made synthetically from salicylic aldehyde; used to disguise unpleasant odors.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cou·ma·rin

(kū'mă-rin)
A general descriptive term applied to anticoagulants and other drugs derived from dicumarol.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Coumarins can be categorized into simple coumarins, pyranocoumarins, furanocoumarins, chromones and dimeric coumarins.
More recently, four pyranocoumarins and two lignans from the stem and root bark were shown to inhibit DNA synthesis in human HL-60 leukemia cells (Ju et al., 2001).