Maslow's hierarchy of needs

(redirected from Pyramid of needs)

Maslow's hierarchy of needs

 
see need.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the two lowest levels of his pyramid of needs was the necessity for basic physiological requirements (food/shelter/healthy bodily functions, etc) and for basic safety and security (safety, employment, family etc).
Abraham Maslow's theory of motivation and his world-wide famous "Pyramid of Needs" played an outstanding role in both aspects.
As Luc Boltanski and Eve Chiapello (2007) pointed out, security formed an essential part of the implicit and distinctive definition of the work contract within this period, and Maslow's "Pyramid of Needs" imparted psychological evidence to the spread belief that the need of security was of crucial importance, thus resting at the base of his hierarchy.
“Hunt's Hierarchy of Partnership Needs” details how a couple can help each other scale Maslow's classic Pyramid of Needs. “Tea Time” cites how all the major religions have commanded their congregations to obey the same core concept of kindness.
who would buy a smartphone but are still worried about food or shelter, the basics in Maslow's pyramid of needs. Maybe we have already self-actualized with our iPhone 2.0 and just don't feel the 5.0 will make enough difference to have to adapt to it.
Maslow developed the pyramid of needs to represent a hierarchy of human motives, with those at the bottom taking precedence over those higher up.
"Reminder to Self: The Eight Life Principles for Living from Your Truest Self" is a memoir of one man attempting to reach this pinnacle, and how during this pursuit, the rest of the pyramid of needs collapsed under him.
One must understand the insurgent's motivations while undermining his pyramid of needs (weapons, financing, and a supportive population).
Intended as a long-term installation (opening October 21), this 18-foot-high Styrofoam mountain snow-scape with two bearded climbers staring at the words "Hamburger Hill" carved into the glacier above them refers not only to the famous 1987 anti-Vietnam War movie, but also to the artist's long-term interest in philosopher Abraham Maslow's 1943 theory of a "pyramid of needs," raising the thought that instead of always seeking more through whatever means necessary, humans might begin to seek a more elevating if equitable fuel.
The Hindu spiritual leader Sree Ram Sharma Jee prescribes a very simple formula for it and recommends two approaches: 'There are two ways to be happy; minimise your needs and live in harmony with the surroundings.' Erection of a pyramid of needs leads to a chase to acquire physical means to build it.
On the pyramid of needs this is at the top, representing a genuine partnership between pharmacy and drug wholesaler.
In Maslow's pyramid of needs, the lowest level concerns our basic needs such as food and shelter.