mydriasis

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mydriasis

 [mĭ-dri´ah-sis]
great dilatation of the pupil.

my·dri·a·sis

(mi-drī'ă-sis),
Dilation of the pupil.
[G.]

mydriasis

(mĭ-drī′ə-sĭs)
n.
Dilation of the pupil of the eye, especially when excessive or prolonged, usually as a result of trauma, a medical disorder, or a drug.

my·dri·a·sis

(mi-drī'ă-sis)
Dilation of the pupil.
[G.]

mydriasis

Widening (dilatation) of the pupil of the eye, usually as a result of instillation of a mydriatic drug, such as ATROPINE or CYCLOPENTOLATE.

mydriasis

1. Dilatation of the pupil. 2. The condition of an eye having an abnormally large pupil diameter (5 mm in daylight). The condition may be due to a paralysis of the sphincter pupillae muscle, to an irritation of the sympathetic pathway, to a drug (e.g. atropine, homatropine), or to adaptation to darkness. See miosis; dilator pupillae muscle; mydriatic; pupil.

my·dri·a·sis

(mi-drī'ă-sis)
Dilation of the pupil.
[G.]
References in periodicals archive ?
We suspect that her transient hypertension and pupillary dilatation were caused by the systemic absorption and local spread of the topical phenylephrine.
Patients with unilateral pupillary dilatation do better than those with bilateral pupillary abnormalities (Chesnut et al., 1994).
Topical phenylephrine solutions are widely used in ophthalmic surgery, both for capillary vasoconstriction and for pupillary dilatation. Ophthalmic phenylephrine is rapidly systemically absorbed through the nasolacrimal system and may have undesired side-effects.
He was followed and remained well for 22 months, at which time he developed headache, pupillary dilatation, and episodes of torticollis.
Three circulars scans each 3.4 mm diameter centered on optic disc was obtained after full pupillary dilatation, which was averaged by fast RNFL thickness 3.4 program.
Intra ocular pressure (IOP) was measured using Goldmann Applanation Tonometry, an average of three IOP readings were obtained prior to pupillary dilatation. Gonioscopy was performed in patients who had suspicious glaucomatous findings.
The reduced pupillary dilatation and zonular fragility also leads to complications such as posterior capsular rent, vitreous loss and retained cortical material.