Punnett square


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Punnett square

 [pun´et]
a graphic depiction in grid form of how genes from each parent might combine in an offspring.
Punnett square showing sex chromosome combinations for male and female gametes. From Mueller and Young, 2001.

Punnett square

Etymology: Reginald C. Punnett, English geneticist, 1875-1967; OFr, esquarre
a matrix that shows all of the possible combinations of male and female gametes when one or more pairs of independent alleles are crossed. Letters representing the male and female gametes are placed along the left side and the top of the matrix, respectively. The genotypes of the offspring produced by each pairing of gametes occupy the cells in the matrix. See also pedigree.
enlarge picture
Punnett square
Punnett squareclick for a larger image
Fig. 262 Punnett square.

Punnett square

a table devised by the British geneticist R. Punnett, in which all possible combinations of gametes and progeny are displayed in a grid structure. For example in the cross:

Aa, Bb x aa, Bb

the Punnett square would be as in Fig. 262.

Punnett,

Reginald Crundall, English geneticist, 1875-1967.
Punnett square - a grid used in genetics. Synonym(s): checkerboard
References in periodicals archive ?
Following the same procedure as the monohybrid test, students build the Punnett square using the mathematical concept in Table 4.
Mathematical concept in Punnett squares for predicting flower color in F1 and F2 generations.
Question: What percent of the kittens in the Punnett square below will exhibit polydactyly, a dominant trait?
But the Punnett Square illustrates the odds of any color emerging.
However, the largest gains were observed in questions related to the use of a Punnett square to solve Mendelian genetics (Q23 and Q24) and to understanding the relationship between cellular functions and cell division (Q31).
Students can learn more about genetic inheritance by completing the interactive Punnett Square at: www2.
The students draw population Punnett squares (after fig.
This activity presumes that students have received basic instruction in constructing Punnett squares and predicting offspring genotypes.
Hopefully, by the time we throw those square caps in the air we'll have learned more than Punnett squares and the Pythagorean theorem.
They use Punnett squares to determine the possible outcomes of various crosses.
While Punnett squares are a useful device for determining the outcome of genetic crosses, they can become cumbersome for dihybrid or trihybrid crosses.
After learning about meiosis, including the random metaphase alignment of chromosomes, monohybrid crosses, use of Punnett squares, and Gregor Mendel's Theory of Segregation, introduce students to dihybrid crosses involving two independently assorting genes.