pulsus paradoxus


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pulsus

 [pul´sus] (L.)
pulsus alter´nans alternating pulse.
pulsus bige´minus bigeminal pulse.
pulsus bisfe´riens a pulse characterized by two strong systolic peaks separated by a midsystolic dip, most commonly occurring in pure aortic regurgitation with stenosis.
pulsus ce´ler quick pulse.
pulsus dif´ferens inequality of the pulse observable at corresponding sites on either side of the body.
pulsus paradox´us paradoxical pulse.
pulsus par´vus et tar´dus a small hard pulse that rises and falls slowly.
pulsus tar´dus slow pulse.

par·a·dox·ic pulse

an exaggeration of the normal variation in the systemic arterial pulse volume with respiration, becoming weaker with inspiration and stronger with expiration; characteristic of cardiac tamponade, rare in constrictive pericarditis; so called because these changes are independent of changes in the cardiac rate as measured directly or by electrocardiogram.

pulsus paradoxus

Cardiology A marked ↓ in pulse amplitude during normal quiet inspiration or a ↓ in the systolic pressure by > 10 mm Hg, a typical finding in cardiac tamponade, less common in constrictive pericarditis–quantifiable by a sphygmomanometer, superior vena cava obstruction, asthma, PE, shock, or after thoracotomy

par·a·dox·ic pulse

(par'ă-doks'ik pŭls)
A reversal of the normal variation in the pulse volume with respiration, the pulse becoming weaker with inspiration and stronger with expiration; characteristic of cardiac tamponade and rare in constrictive pericarditis. So called because these changes are independent of changes in the cardiac rate as measured directly or by electrocardiogram.
Synonym(s): pulsus paradoxus.
References in periodicals archive ?
The high venous pressure leads to the distension of the jugular veins (Kussmaul-sign) the cardiac sounds are "mufied." In addition, the peripherial pulse cannot be palpated while cardiac auscultation detects heartbeats, this is referred as pulsus paradoxus. The ECG signs reveal the lower amplitude of R waves due to the increased resistance of intra-pericardial liquids (5, 10).
Although pulsus paradoxus was not observed, other physical findings were extremely concerning for cardiac tamponade.
Blood pressure was 100/60 mm Hg without evidence of pulsus paradoxus. However, echocardiography showed a large pericardial effusion (>5 cm) with significant respiratory variations (i.e., >25%) of mitral inflow and inferior vena cava plethora (Figure 3).
Symptomatic patients present with precordial pain, hypotension, pulsus paradoxus, shortness of breath, and cyanosis occasionally [5,15,18].
All are technologically refined versions of jugular venous waveform (CVP max/min, RAP max/min, and IVC collapsibility) or "pulsus paradoxus" (stroke volume variation, pulse pressure variation).
Central to establishing a diagnosis of cardiac tamponade is the presence of a pulsus paradoxus >10 mmHg in a patient with a pericardial effusion; this sign may, however, be difficult to elicit in a hypotensive patient.
On physical examination she was dyspnoeic, heart rate was 110 beats/min, and blood pressure was 80/50 mmHg with a pulsus paradoxus of 22 mmHg.
Physical signs like Pallor, Sweating, exhaustion, cyanosis and unconsciousness, tachycardia >120bpm and tachypnoea >30/min, pulsus paradoxus, silent chest.
Physical examination reveals tachycardia and hypotensive neck vein distention diminished heart sounds and pulsus paradoxus. The auscultation may find a mill-wheel" murmur arising from the heart beating in a pericardial cavity filled with air and fluid.6The radiographic findings of pneumopericardium may present the small heart sign" the flattened heart sign" the halo sign" outlined by air surrounding the compressed heart.78 The CT scan is considerably sensitive to disclose the presence of little indiscernible gas by chest X-ray.
In patients presenting with these symptoms, deep cardiac sounds, hypotension, venous distension and pulsus paradoxus suggest tamponade and the definite diagnosis can be made by echocardiographic examination.
Additionally, his pulse was poorer when he was breathing in, a phenomenon called pulsus paradoxus.
The patient continued to be short of breath with edema and developed a blood pressure of 80 mm Hg with pulsus paradoxus of 20 mm Hg and neck vein distension.