pulmonary surfactant

(redirected from Pulmonary surfactants)

pulmonary surfactant

A lipoprotein secreted by type II alveolar cells that decreases the surface tension of the fluid lining the alveoli, permitting expansion. Synthetic lung surfactant is available for treating patients with respiratory distress syndrome. In obstetrics, fetal production of surfactant can be stimulated by administration of a glucocorticoid 24 to 48 hr before an inevitable preterm birth.
Synonym: lung surfactant See: betamethasone; lecithin-sphingomyelin ratio
See also: surfactant
References in periodicals archive ?
Deshpande, "Pulmonary surfactants and their role in pathophysiology of lung disorders," Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, vol.
The conducting airways are lined with a biphasic gel-aqueous mucus layer, whereas alveoli are lined with alveolar lining fluid and pulmonary surfactant [34].
Comparisons of efficacy of different pulmonary surfactants for the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.
Objective: To analyze the therapeutic effect of pulmonary surfactant (PS) in combination with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) therapy on neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS).
KEY WORDS: Neonate, Pulmonary surfactant, Respiratory distress syndrome.
Clinical study on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) combined with pulmonary surfactant in treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.
Maeda, "Molecular pathology of pulmonary surfactants and cytokines in drowning compared with other asphyxiation and fatal hypothermia," International Journal of Legal Medicine, vol.
Maeda, "Immunohistochemical investigation of a pulmonary surfactant in fatal mechanical asphyxia," International Journal of Legal Medicine, vol.
The patent provides coverage for compositions that employ a combination of certain pulmonary surfactants with a broad array of protease inhibitors, administered as either a liquid or aerosol, for treating pulmonary inflammation, the company said.
Discovery believes that through its technology, pulmonary surfactants have the potential, for the first time, to be developed into a series of respiratory therapies for critical care and other hospitalized patients where there are few or no approved therapies available.
During this period]' his research on pulmonary surfactants further illuminated the ways in which surfactants are produced by lung cells, their importance in normal pulmonary function, and how they interact with chemicals and hormones.
As a quick reminder, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) of the newborn is the seventh most common cause of perinatal mortality in the United States, and it is caused by a deficiency of pulmonary surfactant at birth.