PLR

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PLR

pupillary light reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gillian McKeith's You Are What You Eat, according to a study by the Public Lending Right organisation.
New charts published by the Public Lending Right show that crime novels were the most borrowed books from UK libraries in 2005.
Wilson, 58, had more than two million loans last year, according to the Public Lending Right list.
Not only because books are a vital resource in a civilised society, not because, as a published author I do very well out of the Public Lending Right, but because, in these troubled times, libraries are a resource for anyone in search of information.
The submission included case studies from writers such as Wendy Cope and Philip Pullman who made the case that many writers rely on the payments they receive from secondary uses of their work like the lending of their books in libraries (from Public Lending Right in the UK and from overseas PLR schemes via the Authors' Licensing & Collecting Society), particularly when embarking on a career in writing when they provided welcome incentive.
Karin Slaughter's Genesis, a chilling crime thriller, was ranked second in the top 10 most-borrowed books table published by the Public Lending Right.
But hopes remain that the work of the Public Lending Right will continue to be carried out from Stockton by the agency's 12-strong team.
Public Lending Right (PLR) found his book Folly was the most loaned title in a study to tie in with tomorrow's Valentine's Day.
Public Lending Right, the organization established by Parliament to pay authors a small fee every time one of their books is borrowed, compiled the figures.
Catherine Cookson, according to Public Lending Right figures.
The figures were compiled by the Public Lending Right scheme.
Public Lending Right, the scheme in which registered authors receive royalties when their books are borrowed from public libraries, has revealed that 158 million registered books were borrowed between 1 July 2003 and 30 June 2004 compared with 169 million in the same period a year ago, July 2002 to June 2003.
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