psychotropic drug


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psy·cho·trop·ic drug

any drug that affects the mind.

psychotropic drug

Psychoactive drug Pharmacology A drug that affects brain activities associated with mental processes and behavior Categories Anti-psychotics; antidepressants; antianxiety drugs or anxiolytics; hypnotics. See Antidepressant, antipsychotic, Anxiolytic, Hypnotic.

psychotropic drug

A drug that affects psychic function, behavior, or experience. Many drugs can be classed as intentionally psychotropic, but many other drugs also occasionally may produce undesired psychotropic side effects.
See also: drug
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: Mostly parents were of the opinion that are of psychotropic drugs lead to certain side effects and somehow effects brain which may cause biological abnormalities resulting into several medical diseases.
A psychotropic drug such as venlafaxine (which has an elimination half-life of around 5 hours) can cause significant withdrawal and possible destabilization.
Therefore, US children are commonly treated with psychotropic drugs for a multitude of disorders, including anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, psychotic disorders, ADHD, autism spectrum disorders, and depression (National Institute of Mental Health, 2012b).
Growth in psychotropic drug spending was larger for blacks and Latinos than for whites: relative to whites, annual growth in spending was 3.
The newer psychotropic drugs introduced in the mid-1990s have especially been found to be more promising than the earlier traditional psychotropic drugs.
The study found that psychotropic drug prescriptions for teenagers in the United States skyrocketed 250 per cent between 1994 and 2001.
Psychotropic drug use has a unique ethical dimension in that it involves self-administration of a chemical that affects the very same organ that must be used in order to decide whether to use that chemical.
In 1986 sales of psychotropic drugs, which treat such mental disorders as depression and anxiety as well as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease, totaled almost $2 billion.
Louis found that of the children surveyed from 2000 to 2003 for the Medicaid Analytic Extract data from 36 states, more than 1 percent of children 4 years old and younger received at least one psychotropic drug.
Use of any psychotropic drug was highest among non-Hispanic white adolescents, with 8% reporting use, compared with 3% of non-Hispanic black adolescents and just under 3% of Mexican-American adolescents.
The legislation comes amid reports that despite recent reforms, rates of psychotropic drug use among Texas foster children remains high.