stimulant

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stimulant

 [stim´u-lant]
1. producing stimulation, especially by stimulation of muscle fibers through nervous tissue.
2. an agent that has such effects.

stim·u·lant

(stim'yū-lănt),
1. Stimulating; exciting to action.
See also: stimulus.
2. An agent that arouses organic activity, strengthens the action of the heart, increases vitality, and promotes a sense of well-being; classified according to the parts on which they chiefly act: cardiac, respiratory, gastric, hepatic, cerebral, spinal, vascular, genital.
See also: stimulus. Synonym(s): excitor, stimulator
Synonym(s): excitant
[L. stimulans, pres. p. of stimulo, pp. -atus, to goad, incite, fr. stimulus, a goad]

stimulant

(stĭm′yə-lənt)
n.
An agent, especially a chemical agent such as caffeine, that temporarily arouses or accelerates physiological or organic activity.

stimulant

adjective Relating to anything that ↑ activity, especially of the nervous system noun Pharmacology Any substance that evokes ↑ activity–eg, a CNS stimulant, cardiovascular stimulant, and others. See Amphetamine, Dextroamphetamine, Ephedrine, Herbal ecstasy, MDMA, Methamphetamine, Methcatinon, Methylphenidate, OTC stimulant, Phenmetrazine, Sexual stimulant.

stim·u·lant

(stim'yū-lănt)
1. Stimulating; exciting to action.
2. An agent that arouses organic activity, strengthens the action of the heart, increases vitality, and promotes a sense of well-being; classified according to the parts on which it chiefly acts: cardiac, respiratory, gastric, hepatic, cerebral, spinal, vascular, or genital.
Synonym(s): stimulator.
See also: stimulus
[L. stimulans, pres. p. of stimulo, pp. -atus, to goad, incite, fr. stimulus, a goad]

stim·u·lant

(stim'yū-lănt)
1. Stimulating; exciting to action.
2. Agent that arouses organic activity, strengthens heart action, increases vitality, and promotes sense of well-being.
Synonym(s): excitant.
[L. stimulans, pres. p. of stimulo, pp. -atus, to goad, incite, fr. stimulus, a goad]

Patient discussion about stimulant

Q. How does a Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) unit help fibromyalgia. My aunt was suggested to go through TENS. Will that really help? How does a Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) unit help fibromyalgia?

A. ‘TENS’ units are prescribed for chronic pain sufferers and fibromyalgia patients. What is a tens unit? Tens stands for Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. A tens unit is essentially a stimulation device consisting of electrodes that are attached to the skin, the unit itself, and a battery to provide current. A Tens unit uses electricity to block nerves from sending pain messages.

Q. Can some depression be treated with stimulantes in adults?? I was treated with dextroamphetimins in the 1970's. Why arent they used anymore? I know all of the things about addiction, so I dont need those answers. When the medication was used by me, it worked. My husband is suffereing from depression he has been given all of the "wonder" drugs No results. I hope someone can answer this for me, and for my husbands sake Thank You Shirley

A. Thank you BLars. I am going to talk to my husbands doctor when we have our appointment tomorrow..I get so tired of all of the experts who wont prescribe the right medications because of the abuse potential..CNS Stimulants were used before, and all of us that were on them when we needed them arent worse for wear..I am glad adderall is helping you.Maybe people like us need to speak out, so other patients arent afraid to ask their doctors..Have a great week!!

Shirley

More discussions about stimulant
References in periodicals archive ?
Death rates involving psychostimulants and any opioid increased from 2003 to 2010, followed by sharper increases from 2010 to 2015 and from 2015 to 2017.
In sensitivity analyses, models were further adjusted for frequency of illicit psychostimulant use.
In fact, a previous article in this journal about student athletes with ADHD (http://bit.ly/2kla6TL) indicated that psychostimulants have "great potential for misuse" and that recently there has been "a surge in nonprescription stimulant use among adolescents and young adults." (17) The authors of the article concluded, however, that while physicians should be aware of the potential for misuse, fear should not preclude treatment.
ADHD symptoms likely respond just as well to stimulants in adults as in children [10], with 70% of patients reported to benefit from psychostimulants [8,11].
Gail therefore had ample time to complete assignments and it became clear that she needed additional support, beyond only psychostimulant medications, to help her stay focused on her academic success.
In fact, hyperlocomotion or stereotypies (27) are not uncommon after psychostimulant administration in animals.
Because of increased recognition of pervasive ADHD-related impairments, which can affect functioning in social, family, and extracurricular settings, practitioners have shifted to long-acting psychostimulants to reduce the need for in-school dosing, improve compliance, and obtain more after-school treatment effects.
Dopamine is key mediator to be responsible for reward and reinforcing effects of psychostimulant such as methamphetamine.
(2006) compared traditional undergraduate students with students over 24 years of age (whom they defined as nontraditional), and found fewer of the older students misused prescription psychostimulants than traditional students.
In the present study we explore the relationship between impulsiveness, sensation-seeking, perceived availability of psychostimulants, risk perception of psychostimulants, antisocial personality patterns, and use of other psychoactive substances (tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis), with the aim of predicting lifetime psychostimulant use (cocaine and ecstasy).
The current issue of CLINICAL PSYCHI-ATRY NEWS features a front-page article about the value of oral ketamine in treating patients not only with depression but with anxiety disorders ("Psychostimulants, Ketamine Lift Depression Quickly in Hospice").
Adderall, Levine explains, is an amphetamine that affects the same neurotransmitters as cocaine (dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine): "If one takes the antidepressant Effexor (affects serotonin and norepinephrine) at the same time one is taking the antidepressant Wellbutrin (affects dopamine), one can sense the hypocrisy in labeling certain psychotropics (drugs that affect neurotransmitters) as 'antidepressants' and other psychotropics as 'ADHD psychostimulants.'" Lots of people--especially young people--are popping 'Addies' (the street name for Adderall), says Levine, "especially during exam time."