psychophysics

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psychophysics

 [si″ko-fiz´iks]
scientific study of the quantitative relations between characteristics or patterns of physical stimuli and the sensations induced by them.

psy·cho·phys·ics

(sī'kō-fiz'iks),
The science of the relation between the physical attributes of a stimulus and the measured, quantitative attributes of the mental perception of that stimulus (for example, the relationship between changes in decibel level and the corresponding changes in the human's perception of the sound).

psychophysics

/psy·cho·phys·ics/ (-fiz´iks) scientific study of quantitative relations between characteristics or patterns of physical stimuli and the sensations induced by them.

psychophysics

(sī′kō-fĭz′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of psychology that deals with the relationships between physical stimuli and sensory response.

psy′cho·phys′i·cal adj.
psy′cho·phys′i·cal·ly adv.
psy′cho·phys′i·cist (-fĭz′ĭ-sĭst) n.

psychophysics

[-fiz′iks]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + physikos, natural
the branch of psychology concerned with the relationships between physical stimuli and sensory responses.

psy·cho·phys·ics

(sī'kō-fiz'iks)
The science of the relation between the physical attributes of a stimulus and the measured, quantitative attributes of the mental perception of that stimulus.

psychophysics

the study of the relationships between the subjectively perceived magnitude of sensations and their actual magnitude, particularly with regard to the ability to detect differences between stimuli of different magnitudes.

psychophysics 

Branch of science that deals with the relationship between the physical stimuli and the sensory response. The measurements of thresholds (e.g. visual acuity, dark adaptation) or matching of stimuli (as in the spectral luminous efficiency curve) are examples of psychophysics. See experimental optometry.

psy·cho·phys·ics

(sī'kō-fiz'iks)
Science of relation between physical attributes of a stimulus and measured quantitative attributes of mental perception of that stimulus.
References in periodicals archive ?
1940) in which its non-psychologist members agreed that psychophysical methods did not constitute scientific measurement, many quantitative psychologists realized that the problem could not be ignored any longer.
He believed that his psychophysical methods produced scales of 'true numerical magnitude' (1936b, p.
However, this variety of liberalized representationalism also posed a threat to psychological measurement and, especially, to Stevens' psychophysical methods.
Secondly, operationism enabled him to believe that his psychophysical methods yielded ratio scale measurement of the intensity of sensations without research into the scientific task of quantification being necessary.
When this operational way of thinking was applied to his psychophysical methods it gave Stevens what he wanted.
Furthermore, to address the problem of back stresses not being well perceived, additional psychophysical methods and scales should be studied.
Finally, psychophysical methods that place most trials in a narrow range of stimulus levels and fail to sample across the region of support of [PSI] are remarkably inefficacious and greatly underestimate [sigma].
All things considered, the QUESTion is yet unsolved as to what psychophysical method places its allowance of trials at the stimulus levels that turn out to be most useful for an accurate estimation of [PSI].
our ultimate goal is to provide practicing psychophysicists with instructions as to how to configure the psychophysical method that renders the best sampling plan for the estimation of [PSI].
To simulate a trial, the stimulus level set by the psychophysical method under consideration was inserted into Y to obtain the probability of success.
The only psychophysical method that our study found appropriate is the optimal dual-staircase design that was identified in Section 7 for each class of [PSI], namely, 1-3 UDTWR (or, as a second-best option, 3x UDWR) staircases in 2AFC detection tasks and 4x (but also 3x and 2x) UDWR staircases in yes-no or 2AFC discrimination tasks.