psychodynamics

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psychodynamics

 [si″ko-di-nam´iks]
the science of mental forces and motivations that influence human behavior and mental activity, including recognition of the role of unconscious motivation in human behavior.

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks),
The systematized study and theory of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing the interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation and the functional significance of emotion. See: role-playing.
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]

psychodynamics

(sī′kō-dī-năm′ĭks, -dĭ-)
n.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) The interaction of various conscious and unconscious mental or emotional processes, especially as they influence personality, behavior, and attitudes.
2. (used with a sing. verb) The study of personality and behavior in terms of such processes.

psy′cho·dy·nam′ic adj.
psy′cho·dy·nam′i·cal·ly adv.

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks)
The systematized study and theory of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing the interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation and the functional significance of emotion.
See also: role-playing
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks)
Systematized study and theory of psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation.
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Value of Using a Psychodynamic Theory in Researching Black Masculinities of Adolescent Boys in Alexandra Township, South Africa.
Vygotsky's theory therefore provides a totally different perspective to child development than Psychodynamic theory. On the one hand psychoanalyst paradigm focuses on intrapsychic phenomenological explanations for child behavior and development as resulting from internal conflicts.
In conclusion, this paper outlined key concepts relating to Psychodynamic theory and their applicability to child cognitive and emotional development.
These concealed, congealed experiences, when externalized as behavior observable to others, were the subject matter of much of psychiatry, psychology, psychodynamic theory, and related conceptual frameworks.
Immersed in orthodox psychodynamic theory for understanding the people and context for practice and its imperfect expression in social casework theories of practice, I faced a caseload of almost all inner-city, poor, black kids in my professional life.
The book thus powerfully illustrates how psychodynamic theory has the potential to be relevant to contemporary South Africa, both as practice and as critique.
psychodynamic theory, personality, political socialization, attitude theory, affect and emotion); public opinion and mass political behavior (e.g.
My own experience of learning about psychodynamic treatment--in a context where I was not able to practice it--has allowed me to ponder ways in which psychodynamic theory may be vividly transmitted to undergraduate students of psychology.
Thus, each includes chapters on historical perspectives, clinical training, professional practice, ethical and legal issues, professional roles, psychodynamic theory, applied behavior analysis, cognitive-behavioral theory, statistical considerations, single-case research, personality, treatment research, diagnostic interviewing, neuropsychological assessment, and behavioral assessment, but the sections on treatment and special issues differ markedly between the two volumes.
Steinberg (formerly Senior Clinical Tutor, Priory Ticehurst House Hospital, Sussex) integrates new ideas from chaos and complexity theories, clinical work and aspects of group and psychodynamic theory to create a new consultative approach.
Group psychotherapy with addicted populations; an integration of twelve-step and psychodynamic theory, 3d ed.
Other models are influenced by either psychodynamic theory or social psychology.