psoralen

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Related to Psoralens: ichthyosis

psoralen

 [sor´ah-len]
any of the constituents of certain plants, such as Psoralea corylifolia, that have the ability to produce phototoxic dermatitis when an individual is first exposed to it and then to sunlight; certain perfumes and drugs, such as methoxsalen, contain psoralens.

psor·a·len

(sōr'ă-len),
A phototoxic drug used by topical or oral administration for the treatment of vitiligo and psoriasis. Also present in oil of bergamot perfume and in fruits and vegetables such as limes, which may cause photosensitization.
See also: PUVA.

psoralen

(sôr′ə-lən)
n.
Any of a group of chemical compounds found in certain plants, used to treat psoriasis and vitiligo.

psoralen

Therapeutics A class of furocoumarins used to treat psoriasis and other skin conditions

psor·a·len

(sōr'ă-len)
A phototoxic drug used topically or orally to treat vitiligo and psoriasis; present in oil of bergamot perfume and in fruits and vegetables such as limes, which may cause photosensitization.

Psoralen

A family of photosensitizing chemicals that can be found in lemons, celery, and other plants. Chemically synthesized versions are used to augment the effects of UVA light treatments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Phototoxic effects of the drugs can also be used for therapeutic purposes, e.g., application of a photosensitizer such as psoralen and aminolevulinic acid.
There are limited numbers of reports suggesting that psoralen plus UVA (PUVA) therapy may trigger the development of BP (Table 1) [3-9].
(2) There have been rare reports of photosensitivity reactions due to ingestion of large quantities of plants containing furocoumarins and psoralens. (3) Plants known to cause phytophotodermatitis are found in almost every country across the globe, and exposure does not have to just be to the fruit, but contact with the leaves or sap also can induce the reaction.
Additional drugs that can produce phototoxic reactions include amiodarone, psoralens and phenothiazines, anticancer drugs, retinoids, zidovudine, and quinine.
Other compounds that were reported to be photo-toxic are selected essential oils, psoralens, sulfamides, coal tar derivatives and fluoroquinolones, as well as particular sunscreens such p-aminobenzoic acid, cinnamates and benzophenones.
The treatment of vitiligo is based on the principles of stimulating the existing melanocytes in the affected area or repopulating it with functioning melanocytes.3 Conservative therapies include photochemotherapy with psoralens and ultraviolet A (PUVA), phototherapy alone with ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation (broadband UVB 290-320 nm, narrowband UVB (NBUVB) 311 nm), topical and systemic steroids and pseudocatalase.
The authors noted that citrus fruits, especially grapefruit, contain psoralens, which are deposited in the skin, where they can interact with ultraviolet light to promote melanoma.
"Our findings are consistent with evidence from animal experiments, which revealed a potential synergistic effect between psoralens and UV radiation, [but] further investigation is needed to confirm our findings and guide sun exposure behaviors among individuals with high citrus consumption."
Phototherapy combined with taking psoralens is also effective.
Fitzpatrick, "The evolution of photochemotherapy with psoralens and UVA (PUVA): 2000 BC to 1992 AD," Photodermatology, Photoimmunology and Photomedecin, vol.
Other iatrogenic risk factors associated with BCC include treatment with psoralens and UVA therapy and NBUVB for various ailments.
Other risk factors for melanomas include three or more blistering sunburns before age 18 years, congenital nevi, large numbers of moles, and long-term phototherapy for eczema or psoriasis with psoralens and UVA (PUVA).