Providentia


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Providentia

Microbiology A genus of Enterobateriaceae found in water, soil, and fecally contaminated materials; 5 species P alcalifaciens, P heimbachae, P rettgeri, P rustigianii, P stuartii
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although various bacterial and yeast strains can and do lead to UTIs or CAUTIs, when it comes to urinary crystalline catheter encrustation, the urease-producing species Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, and Providentia rettgeri are of interest in most studies [5, 18, 19, 20].
(4) The Stoic theme of Providence had been developed by Seneca in the treatise De Providentia. See in this regard, A.-M Guillemin, 'Seneque, Directeur d'Ames', Revue des Etudes Latines, 30 (1952), 202-19; 31 (1953), 215-234; 32 (1954), 250-274.
196-197) y en las de Italica, un ara dedicada a la Providentia Augusti (RPC I nos.
(36) Salviano, De Gubernatione Dei, I, 19: omniaque ita a providentia incolumitatem quasi corpus ab anima vitam trahant.
Beyer observa tambien la influencia de las Divinae institutiones de Lactancio (37), clave para entender el principal argumento de la obra: el atentado al rey no pone en duda su capacidad como gobernante cristiano, sino que sirve para poner a prueba su virtud, una idea que antes del cristianismo se hallaba en el De providentia de Seneca y que se convirtio en un autentico lugar comun.
The kind of principle we associate with Providentia, with a narrator first and foremost wanting to show that the happenings recounted reveal divine justice, or appropriate rewards and punishments, seems a key reason for writing a record or 'history' from the very beginning.
Seneca, De Providentia, Moral Essays, Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1958), 5.8: Ille ipse omnium conditor et rector scripsit quidem fata, sed sequitur ("The great author and ruler of all things wrote the decrees of fate indeed, but he also follows them.
In 1558, the Roman Inquisition linked the denigration of the faith, Church, and clergy to pasquinades, and harsh penalties were announced for authoring, possessing, or diffusing libelous material in the bull Romani Pontificis providentia (1572).