Proteus


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Related to Proteus: Proteus syndrome, Proteus vulgaris

Proteus

 [pro´te-us]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacteria. Organisms are found in fecal material, especially in patients treated with oral antibiotics. P. mira´bilis is a leading cause of urinary tract infections. P. morga´nii is found in the intestines and is associated with summer diarrhea of infants. P. vulga´ris is a common cause of cystitis and pyelonephritis and is associated with eye and ear infections, pleuritis, peritonitis, and suppurative abscesses.

Proteus

(prō'tē-ŭs),
1. A former genus of the Sarcodina, now termed Amoeba.
2. A genus of motile, peritrichous, non-spore-forming, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative rods; coccoid forms, large irregular involution forms, filaments, and spheroplasts occur under different culture conditions. The metabolism is fermentative, producing acid or acid and visible gas from glucose; lactose is not fermented, and they rapidly decompose urea and deaminate phenylalanine. Proteus occurs primarily in fecal matter and in putrefying materials. The type species is Proteus vulgaris.
[G. Proteus, a sea god, who had the power to change his form]

proteus

(prō′tē-əs)
n. pl. pro·tei (-tē-ī′)
Any of various gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria of the genus Proteus, certain species of which are associated with human enteritis and urinary tract infections.

Pro·te·us

(prō'tē-ŭs)
A genus of motile, peritrichous, non-spore-forming, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria containing gram-negative rods. The metabolism is fermentative, producing acid. Proteus occurs primarily in fecal matter and in putrefying materials.
[G. Proteus, a sea god, who had the power to change his form]

Proteus

A genus of GRAM NEGATIVE, rod-shaped bacteria that frequently cause urinary infections or ENTERITIS. A common species is Proteus vulgaris .

Pro·te·us

(prō'tē-ŭs)
A genus of motile, peritrichous, non-spore-forming, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria found primarily in fecal matter and in putrefying materials.
[G. Proteus, a sea god, who had the power to change his form]
References in periodicals archive ?
Proteus syndrome is an ultra-rare condition characterized by the aberrant overgrowth of multiple tissues of the body.
Proteus wouldn't be the first moon in the solar system to have been hit by a comet and birthed a new moon, according to the researchers.
Early modern thinkers use this story of Proteus to figure a wide range of topics and practices.
Complicated catheter-associated urinary tract infections due to Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.
"This is an exciting and significant move for Proteus," said Henry.
In the current study, the predominant pathogens were E.coli, followed by S.aureus, Pseudomonas sp., MRSA, Proteus Marbillis, E.coli ESBL producer, Acinetobacter, Proteus valgaris and [beta]-Streptococci respectively.
Without a mosaicism, Proteus syndrome cannot exist biologically.
"Our Proteus users often need the symbols, footprints and 3-D models for the constant flow of new silicon devices," said Iain Cliffe, executive director, Labcenter Electronics.
For doctors, this information helps facilitate more open discussion with the patient, according to Otsuka and Proteus. The aim is to provide more clarity to better inform decision making for both physicians and patients, who can discontinue sharing some information from the system or opt out of the program at any time.
For his team's impressive performance over the course of the regatta, Proteus owner George Sakeilaris was presented with an RM 60-01 Regatta Voiles de Saint Barth watch from principal partner, Richard Mille.
What are the chances that he'll be pursued by Silvia, and Silvia by Proteus, and Proteus by Julia, and that all will be waited upon - after a fashion - by their servants Speed and Launce and even Launce's dog, Crab?