will

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will

 [wil]
a legal declaration of a person's wishes, usually regarding disposal of possessions after the person has died.
living will advance directives.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

will

(wil),
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

will

Forensics
“The legal expression or declaration of a person’s mind or wishes as to the disposition of his property, to be performed or take effect after his death”.

Medspeak-UK
A document which sets out who is to benefit from an individual’s property and possessions (estate) after his or her death. It also ensures that the estate is passed as intended, after taxes and debts have been paid.

Vox populi
Desire or volition (as in the “will to live”).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

will

1. Desire, volition, as in the 'will to live', see there.
2. 'The legal expression or declaration of a person's mind or wishes as to the disposition of his property, to be performed or take effect after his death'. See Advance directive, Living will.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

will

(wil)
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

will

(wil)
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The father remains irresponsible--one wonders where the court is in the financial protection of the family left behind.
He further explained that while the state "may not interfere with the internal governing, structure, and maintenance of the family." the "protection of the family is a responsibility of the State," and child custody disputes "involve decision-making by the State, within the limits of its sphere of authority, in a way that preserves the fundamental family structure." In pursuit of that objective, he contended, the state must wield authority within its legitimate sphere of influence "to prevent the subversion of children toward this [homosexual] lifestyle, to not encourage a criminal lifestyle."
By the twenties, an ethos of adjustment had taken hold among a range of mental hygienists, who, in contrast to censorious Progressive reformers, advocated independence for the young, one arguing, for example, that both boys and girls should "leave behind the comfortable protection of the family and maternal solicitude." (p.

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