prostrate

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prostrate

(prŏs′trāt′)
tr.v. pros·trated, pros·trating, pros·trates
1. To put or throw flat with the face down, as in submission or adoration: "He did not simply sit and meditate, he also knelt down, sometimes even prostrated himself" (Iris Murdoch).
2. To cause to lie flat: The wind prostrated the young trees.
3. To reduce to extreme weakness or incapacitation; overcome: an illness that prostrated an entire family; a nation that was prostrated by years of civil war.
adj.
1. Lying face down, as in submission or adoration.
2. Lying flat or at full length.
3. Reduced to extreme weakness or incapacitation; overcome.
4. Botany Growing flat along the ground.

pros′tra′tor n.

prostrate

(prŏs′trāt) [Gr. pro, before, + L. sternere, stretch out]
1. Lying with the body extended, usually face down.
2. To deprive of strength or to exhaust.

prostrate

see PROCUMBENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Islamic prostration to offer thanks to God became visible during the football matches played by Saudi Arabia during the World Cup in 1994 when players came together after scoring a goal and kneeled to offer thanks to God in a gesture emulating the prayer rituals performed in mosques.
However, Dr Ahmad Abdul Aziz Al Haddad this week told Saudi newspaper Al Eqtisadiya that players needed to meet strict conditions to perform the prostration of thanks and these include purity of the body, the coverage of their private parts and kneeling towards Makkah.
The players in fact may need to perform ablution to cleanse their bodies and are not sufficiently covered for the prostration," Al Haddad said.
The Mufti told the paper that scoring a goal was not a blessing that warranted a prostration of thanks and gratitude to God, adding that watching football matches could in fact take away people from praying and praising God.
Because of the genuflection, prostration and sitting on the floor or ground, the inmate should be allowed to have a small prayer rug or a suitable floor covering should be provided.
As noted above, De Quincey describes Cunningham's expressions of admiration for Scott and Southey as "too oriental prostrations.
Calling Cunningham's prostrations "oriental" therefore registers their threat to De Quincey's sense of himself as a literate English subject.
On July 13, newspapers reported five deaths in the Hub and said that heat prostrations continued.
Civic belonging in our imagined Jerusalem is no longer available to those who simply seek it but accessible only to the "masters of the universe" and those richly endowed tithe-payers who willingly submit to the ritual prostrations of metal detectors, strip searches and I.
After stretches in bed, I get up and do 25 prostrations, or bows to the ground.
These robust gestures of Muslim prayer, the profound prostrations, and the expressiveness of its postures are often contrasted, I find, with many Christian rituals in which movement and gesture has been reduced to an embarrassing minimum - the involvement of the body sacrificed, as it were, to a greater reliance on words - to substitute - and to explain symbols that have now become so vestigial that they can no longer speak for themselves.
Utter glorifications of Allah many times in your Rukoo' (bowing) and make many supplications in your Sajdah (prostration), as a Muslim is nearest to Allah when he is in prostration.