Prostaglandin analogue

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Prostaglandin analogue

A class of drugs that are similar in structure and function to prostaglandin.
Mentioned in: Glaucoma
References in periodicals archive ?
beta] blockers which reduce the aqueous formation and prostaglandin analogs that increase uveoscleral outflow are the most commonly used the first line drugs.
Prostaglandin analogs (PGAs) are FPreceptor agonists that reduce IOP by increasing aqueous humor outflow via remodeling of the ciliary muscle extracellular matrix, subsequently increasing uveoscleral outflow (SMITH et al.
The most widely prescribed glaucoma drugs include the prostaglandin analogs (PGAs) that lower IOP by increasing the aqueous drainage through the unconventional uveoscleral outflow pathway, whereas the non-PGA drug classes such as the beta blockers, alpha agonists, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, lower IOP by decreasing the production of aqueous humor.
ENV515 also demonstrated an IOP lowering effect comparable to prestudy topical prostaglandin analogs (XALATAN and LUMIGAN) and in-study topical timolol maleate 0.
2% (BBFC) used Adjunctive to Prostaglandin Analogs (PGAs): Findings show additive effect of BBFC therapy in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension who were inadequately controlled on PGA alone.
In clinical practice, most patients begin the anti-glaucoma treatments with a single topical drug such as prostaglandin analogs, [sz]-blockers, a-agonists, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.
Ocular also provides prostaglandin analog punctum plugs that are hydrogel-based punctum plug depots to deliver prostaglandin analogs to treat glaucoma.
Many prescription eye drops, including prostaglandin analogs or look-alikes such as latanoprost, are believed to lower pressure within the eyes by increasing fluid outflow.
Prostaglandin analogs such as travoprost (Travatan) to increase draining of intraocular fluid.
Topical prostaglandin analogs (Lumigan) increase the flow of fluid out of the eye.
Overall, prostaglandin analogs, a newer class of eyedrop, are the most effective medications," says Simon Law, MD, associate professor of ophthalmology at JSEI, "but there are significant individual variations in response to medications.
These include prostaglandin analogs such as prostacyclin and low-dose inhaled nitric oxide.