prophylactic

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prophylactic

 [pro″fĭ-lak´tik]
1. pertaining to prophylaxis.
2. tending to ward off disease.
3. an agent that so acts.
4. condom.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·phy·lac·tic

(prō'fi-lak'tik),
1. Preventing disease; relating to prophylaxis. Synonym(s): preventive
2. An agent that acts to prevent a disease.
[G. prophylaktikos; see prophylaxis]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

prophylactic

(prō′fə-lăk′tĭk, prŏf′ə-)
adj.
Acting to defend against or prevent something, especially disease; protective.
n.
1. A prophylactic agent, device, or measure, such as a vaccine or drug.
2. A contraceptive device, especially a condom.

pro′phy·lac′ti·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

prophylactic

adjective Referring to a preventive manoeuvre.

noun An older term for condom.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

prophylactic

Medtalk adjective Preventive, protective noun A drug, vaccine, regimen, or device designed to prevent or protect against a given disorder Vox populi Condom, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pro·phy·lac·tic

(prō'fi-lak'tik)
1. Preventing disease; relating to prophylaxis.
Synonym(s): preventive.
2. An agent that acts to prevent a disease.
3. Colloq. used to mean condom, and to a lesser extent, a method of birth control.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

prophylactic

And any act, procedure, drug or equipment used to guard against or prevent an unwanted outcome, such as a disease.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Prophylactic

Guarding from or preventing the spread or occurrence of disease or infection.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

prophylactic 

1. Preventing disease. 2. An agent or a remedy that either prevents the development of a disease or prevents the worsening of a disease process.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

pro·phy·lac·tic

(prō'fi-lak'tik)
1. Preventing disease; relating to prophylaxis.
Synonym(s): preventive.
2. Agent that acts to prevent disease. e.g., a condom
[G. prophylaktikos; see etymology of prophylaxis]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The Court's judgment in Prosper (57) likewise makes sense only when one distinguishes between constitutional rules and prophylactic rules.
Prosper provides a clue as to how recognition of prophylactic rules can untie the hands of legislatures.
One might be tempted to reduce this paper to a simple (and somewhat trendy) appeal for "dialogue" between the courts and legislatures: courts should recognize, in their writings, the difference between constitutional rules and prophylactic rules, because in doing so they clarify the ways in which legislatures can contribute to the branches' combined understanding of what the constitution demands.
But when the Court muddies the distinction between constitutional rules and prophylactic rules, no one can blame a legislature for crafting laws that seem to fly in the face of a court ruling.
Should the courts uphold the new rule because the old rule was merely prophylactic (though, again, not identified as such), they seriously undermine their own status in the constitutional order.
(72) This permits one to imagine a judiciary that invites the legislature to question its constitutional interpretations and, at the same time, a legislature that trusts--indeed, relies on--the judiciary to craft prophylactic rules unless and until the legislature decides a different strategy is needed.
Strauss, "The Ubiquity of Prophylactic Rules" (1988) 55 U.
Landsberg, "Safeguarding Constitutional Rights: The Uses and Limits of Prophylactic Rules" (1999) 66 Tenn.
436 (1966) were prophylactic in nature, the Court could create exceptions to them; the Court proceeded to find a "public safety' exception" at 655.
(14) I leave aside, for now, whether lower courts should engage in this kind of "under-ruling" when it comes to fashioning prophylactic rules, beating in mind the Supreme Court's holding that findings of legislative fact should not be subject to appellate deference.
Note, however, that Ford appears to regard the idea of prophylactic rules as a dead letter in Canada, whereas I would argue that they are everywhere, though not clearly identified.