propagule

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propagule

  1. an infective stage of a plant PATHOGEN such as a fungal spore, by which the organism gains entry into a plant host.
  2. any part of an organism that is liberated from the adult form and which can give rise to a new individual, such as a fertilized egg or spore.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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The most desirable feature of encapsulated vegetative propagules is to retain their viability after storage for a reasonable period of time (Micheli et al., 2007; Rai et al., 2008).
The number of propagules and their position on the inflorescence depends mostly on the timing and concentration of chlorflurenol.
Additionally, once introduced in a site, propagules of these pathogens will move on their own following gravity and movement of water in waterways and in underground water tables (Maurel et al.
arrecta propagules and how far macrophyte mats can go, is important to assess the dispersion potential of this invasive species.
Therefore, in order to avoid those drawbacks, it would be crucial that planting material represents a minimum level of intraspecific diversity to ensure that its progeny would not only be viable but also produce viable propagules.
This likely occurred as a result of a higher density of infective propagules in IV inoculum (156 per g), which was four times higher than that in PS inoculum (39 per g) as measured by Restrepo-Llano et al.
However, the mini-cutting presents some advantages over cuttings, as size reduction of cuttings and increased shoots productivity per area, and youth use of propagules (DIAS et al., 2012).
Differences in growth and yield observed among the accessions may be attributed to non-uniformity in the size of the propagules used for establishment of the trial, genotypic and/or climatic factors.
Possibilities include wind, transport of propagules on the feet or in the gut of birds or other animals, or spillover between nearby pools during storms (e.g., Bohonak and Whiteman, 1999; Hulsmans et al., 2007; Graham and Wirth, 2008; Green et al., 2008; Vanschoen-winkel et al., 2008a, 2009; Brochet et al., 2010).