pronator teres muscle

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pro·na·tor te·res mus·cle

(prō-nā'tōr ter'ēz mŭs'ĕl)
Origin, superficial (humeral) head (ulnar) from the common flexor origin on the medial epicondyle of the humerus, deep (ulnar) head from the medial side of the coronoid process of the ulna; insertion, middle of the lateral surface of the radius; action, pronates forearm; nerve supply, median.
Synonym(s): musculus pronator teres [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pronator teres muscle

Arm muscle. Origin: medial epicondyle of humerus, coronoid process of ulna. Insertion: lateral side of middle of radius. Nerve: median (C6-C7). Action: pronates forearm.
See also: muscle
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The muscles sampled were extensor indicis proprius, extensor digitorum communis, brachioradialis, triceps brachii, deltoid, flexor carpi radialis, pronator teres, flexor pollicis longus, and cervical paraspinals.
Stage 3 spasticity was detected in the right shoulder adductor muscles, right pronator teres, right finger flexors, right ankle plantar flexor muscles according to the Modified Ashworth scale.
The muscle group responsible for forearm flexion and pronation (pronator teres, PT; flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, FDS; flexor carpi radialis muscle, FCR; FCU; and palmaris longus muscle, PL) originates from the medial epicondyle of the humerus and supports the motion of elbow flexion [9].
Similar tenderness was found on the lateral forearm extensors, common extensor tendon, and pronator teres muscle.
The most common site of pathology is the interface between the pronator teres and the flexor carpi radialis origin.
El musculo pronador teres (pronator teres) se inicio por dos ramas, una en el epicondilo medial y ligamento colateral y otra en proximal de la fosa coronoidea del humero, insertandose por un tendon aplanado en la cara dorsal del radio (Figura 8).
Variations in its number of branches to pronator teres are frequently seen.
Medial epicondylitis, or golfer's elbow, describes acute or chronic tearing of the flexor carpi radialis and/or pronator teres muscles.
It curves distally and forwards, its apex being connected to the medial border, proximal to the epicondyle, by a fibrous band, to which part of pronator teres is attached.
Botilinum toksin A uygulanan kaslar pektoralis major, lattismus dorsi, triseps, pronator teres ve subskapularistir.