prokaryote

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Related to Prokaryotes: archaea, Archæa

prokaryote

 [pro-kar´e-ōt]
any member of the kingdom Monera; a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single loop of naked double-stranded DNA. The microorganisms, comprising the bacteria and blue-green bacteria (formerly blue-green algae), are predominantly unicellular but may have filamentous, mycelial, or colonial forms. Prokaryotes, with the exception of genus Mycoplasma, have a rigid cell wall. adj., adj prokaryot´ic.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt),
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organismic unit consisting of a single and presumably primitive moneran cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: Prokaryotae, Monera, eukaryote.
Synonym(s): procaryote

prokaryote

also

procaryote

(prō-kăr′ē-ōt′)
n.
Any of various microorganisms of the domains Archaea and Bacteria, characterized by the absence of a distinct membrane-bound nucleus and membrane-bound organelles and by the simultaneous occurrence of DNA transcription and protein synthesis at the same site, in contrast to eukaryotes. Also called moneran.

pro·kar′y·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt)
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organism consisting of a single cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: eukaryote
Synonym(s): procaryote.

prokaryote

or

prokaryote

any organism, including those in the domains BACTERIA or ARCHAEA, that lacks a membrane-bound nucleus and has no MITOSIS or MEIOSIS. Organelles such as the MITOCHONDRION and the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM are also lacking. Compare EUKARYOTE and See Fig. 155 .
References in periodicals archive ?
During the course of evolution, some of the prokaryotes developed mechanisms to utilize oxygen by combining it with food to generate energy.
At the time these two early prokaryotes were evolving, there was no oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere.
In eukaryotes, oxygen is always the terminal electron acceptor, while prokaryotes are capable of using multiple terminal electron acceptors.
The investigators compared the genomes of two yeast species, which are among the most primordial eukaryotes, and 30 prokaryote genomes.
In tropical waters, some didemnid ascidians host the symbiotic photo-oxygenic prokaryote Prochioron (for review see 14).
The accepted scenario is that the prokaryote (a single-celled organism that lacks a nucleus) slowly gave up its independence as well as its cell wall, and some of its genetic information was transferred to the nucleus of its eukaryotic host.
The abundance of prokaryote communities and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi may increase nitrate recycling within soils, but the interaction between these processes, water stress in crops, and precipitation patterns predicted under future climate change scenarios are not known.
These observations are consistent with findings from other studies (both culture-dependent and culture-independent) that have bee n conducted at seafloor hydrothermal vent sites (e.g., Wirsen et al., 1993), and they support previous inferences that minerals play an important role in supporting the growth of S-oxidizing prokaryotes over geological time scales, long after hydrothermal activity dissipates (Eberhard et al., 1995).
According to the study, the reviewed evidence supported the idea that prokaryotes and eukaryotes may have colonized the planet once.
Perhaps the process of endosymbiosis in which prokaryotes became incorporated into other eukaryotic cells is an early form of holobionts.
Codon usage bias has been studied in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes; however, the biasness is different among genes of a species (Comeron and Aguade, 1998).
The presence of complementary transcripts has many functions like genomic organization and gene regulation in prokaryotes (Inouye and Delihas, 1988).