projective test

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projective test

 
any of various tests in which an individual interprets ambiguous stimulus situations, e.g., a series of inkblots (Rorschach t.), according to his own unconscious dispositions, thus yielding information about his personality structure, its underlying dynamics, and possible psychopathology.

pro·jec·tive test

a loosely structured psychological test containing many ambiguous stimuli that require the subject to reveal feelings, personality, or psychopathology in response to them; for example, Rorschach test, thematic apperception test.

projective test

n.
A psychological test in which a subject's responses to ambiguous or unstructured standard stimuli, such as a series of cartoons, abstract patterns, or incomplete sentences, are analyzed in order to determine underlying personality traits, feelings, or attitudes.

projective test

Projection test Psychology A psychologic tests in which a person is presented with unstructured external stimuli–eg, Rorschach inkblots, thematic apperception test, that are ambiguous and subject to subjective interpretation; analysis of responses to the situations or images in a PT provides–in theory, information on unconscious desires, personality traits, interpersonal dynamics. See Psychological testing, Rorschach test.

pro·jec·tive test

(prŏ-jektiv test)
Loosely structured psychological assessment containing ambiguous stimuli that require the patient to reveal feelings, personality, or psychopathology in response.

Projective test

A type of psychological test that assesses a person's thinking patterns, observational ability, feelings, and attitudes on the basis of responses to ambiguous test materials. It is not intended to diagnose psychiatric disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, the expressions and illustrations generated from the projective techniques were also thematically analyzed with the aid of qualitative content analysis accompanied by the two-staged thematic approach (Soane et al., 2012).
Burgess (2012) used a projective technique to attempt to measure preschool children's perception of body shapes: those of other children and then of their own.
We chose Adlerian sand tray therapy as a therapeutic adjunct for five reasons: (a) No research was found addressing implementation of Adlerian sand tray therapy with adult male substance abuse offenders, (b) sand tray attends to unconscious processes, (c) Adlerian sand tray therapy is a projective technique that may enhance self-awareness, (d) Adlerian sand tray therapy may facilitate the development of social interest and may encourage resolution of overwhelming feelings of inferiority that are typically masked by an offenders' superiority complex, and (e) there is sufficient common ground between aspects of Adlerian and cognitive behavioral therapies supporting implementation of Adlerian sand tray therapy in conjunction with cognitive behavioral therapy with offender populations.
Using therapeutic interventions such as projective techniques, sharing, and listening allows children to work through their grief.
This study's use of projective techniques is best illustrated by Kennedy and Lawton's (1996) study that compared the ethical and moral standards of American and Ukrainian business students.
Early recollections as a projective technique. Journal of Projective Techniques, 22(3), 302-311.
Projective techniques in market research are adapted from psychoanalytical methods.
The brand promise must be executed, leveraging the brand and leveraging that particular advantage using projective techniques to perfect the rapport with all audiences.
Projective techniques can play an important role in motivational research.
In qualitative research much depends on the respondent "co-operating fully" with what may seem to be an unusual and demanding type of interview - especially relatively unstructured interviews and those which include requests to participate in potentially embarrassing exercises (projective techniques).
An experimental approach to projective techniques. New York: Wiley.
The metaphoric techniques of Heimlich (1983) and the projective techniques of Crocker (1955) serve as a means of revealing inner fantasies, fears, illogical or disassociated thinking and egocentricity.