trajectory

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trajectory

 [trah-jek´tah-re]
the movement of an object along a three-dimensional path, or of a projectile within an individual's body. 2. the course of a disease.

trajectory

Forensics
The path of a projectile through space, resulting from the forces acting on it—e.g., thrust, wind and gravity.
 
System dynamics
The solution to a dynamical system in forward and backward time, passing through a specified initial condition.
 
Theoretical medicine
The representation of the behaviour of a system in a state-space over a short period of time; a trajectory is one cycle on a phase-plane plot.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the central role that projectile motion plays in the early stages of most introductory physics courses, both at high school and university, a gender gap is likely to be particularly harmful.
Parker, "Projectile motion with air resistance quadratic in the speed," American Journal of Physics, vol.
Analysis of free fall (projectile motion with an inclination of 90[degrees]) When shown this scenario students experience a dissonance as the vertical path of motion does not represent a function.
After finishing the "Projectile Motion" section, ask students to use the drawing tool to draw what they think the parabolic trajectory will be for a bird shot at a shallow angle and a bird shot at a steep angle.
(63) For example, as Sorabji points out, there is the question why air should sometimes impede projectile motion (e.g., see Physics IV 8, 215a28 ff.) and sometimes aid it and what this has to do with the air being hot or cool.
They both rejected the Aristotelian theory that the medium is the cause of projectile motion and considered the speeds of bodies falling along inclined planes and arcs of circles.
* In presenting the topic of projectile motion, several Web sites proved useful in demonstrating how changing the initial angle and velocity affects the distance a projectile travels.
Furthermore, Galileo's analysis of projectile motion, which "offered obvious practical possibilities for artillery and ballistics ...
A Study of Projectile Motion Using a Paintball Gun Wava E.Weikel *, N.
Hooke says that he had written to Newton about planetary and projectile motion in 1679, after developing his own "system of the world" to explain natural phenomena.
He talked about his own research into what motivates students to learn--an inspiring discussion about curiosity, intrinsic motivation and igniting the perfect amount of butane to produce projectile motion using household items.
His topics are projectile motion, rotational motion, sports illusions, collisions, ratings systems, voting systems, saber- and other metrics, randomness in sports, sports strategies, and big data and beyond.