intellectual giftedness

(redirected from Profoundly gifted)
Also found in: Acronyms.

intellectual giftedness

An innate, personal aptitude for intellectual activities that cannot be acquired through personal effort or learning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tracy Cross and Nicolas Colangelo both told me they doubt that profoundly gifted students can be accommodated in the typical public-school classroom: Like profoundly challenged children, they may need special classes, teachers, and even schools that adapt to their differences.
Top 1 in 10,000: A 10-year follow-up of the profoundly gifted. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86, 718-729.
What this encounter taught me was that the profoundly gifted experience life very differently from how the vast majority of people do.
In 2005, the Davidsons worked with the Nevada state legislature to open a public school for profoundly gifted middle- and high-school students.
Noncomparative studies have noted heightened sensitivity (Hebert, 2000), loneliness (Kaiser & Berndt, 1985), social isolation (Gross, 1993), suicide (Cross, Gust-Brey, & Ball, 2002), distress related to sexual orientation (Peterson & Rischar, 2000), vulnerability related to creativity (Csikszentmihalyi, 1996), and depression in profoundly gifted youth (Jackson & Peterson, 2003).
Others interviewed include his early classmate and partner, Carmen de Lavallade, dancers George Faison and Sylvia Waters, and Jamison and the company's associate artistic director, Masazumi Chaya; they share humane recollections of a profoundly gifted artistic leader, much loved and missed.
Would it not then seem all the more obvious that a Johnny-come-lately like man must be the most profoundly gifted creature that ever lived?
The article does not address the needs of the profoundly gifted who require services outside the regular classroom.
PG Retreat for families with highly and profoundly gifted children at the Glyn Eyrie Castle in Colorado Springs, CO.
Jerald Grobman offers a unique perspective in his article, "A Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Approach to the Emotional Problems of Exceptionally and Profoundly Gifted Adolescents and Adults: A Psychiatrist's Experience." In it, he describes an "eclectic form of psychodynamic psychotherapy [that] is presented to address the emotional problems of exceptionally and profoundly gifted adolescents and adults." He describes how the traditional psychotherapy process has been enhanced by including cognitive/behavioral techniques and "psychologically informed" mentoring, coaching, and advising.
Webb), which discusses the need to encourage the development of courage and caring, as well as creativity in gifted students; (2) "Is College an Appropriate Environment for the Profoundly Gifted Child?" (Beth Wright), which discusses the obstacles of admittance to colleges for young gifted students; (3) "Reading the Poet of Transformation: Ovid" (Michael E.
Gifted Conference Planners Beyond IQ (BIQ): A Conference Series for and About Highly and Profoundly Gifted Children at Boston University in Boston, MA.