pro-choice

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pro-choice

adjective Referring to the belief that women should have the right to choose abortion.
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prochoice movement if we are to retain reproductive choice for
In that effort, Henriquez says the Institute plans to partner with a mainstream prochoice group, Choice USA, which has a strong training model.
Baumgardner portrays The Pro-Choice Public Education Project, a collaborative effort of ten prochoice organizations, as a prizewinning advertising campaign disconnected from the grassroots.
The values that sustain and give theoretical legitimacy to both the prolife and the prochoice movements command widespread respect.
But what ought to be equally if not more disturbing to feminists, liberals, and others on the Left is the extent to which prominent prochoice intellectuals mirror that dishonesty and denial.
This definition of the nature of the American party system forms the basis of the simple but important observation that although the institution of the Democratic Party is now and has been for some time supportive of reproductive rights, the Democratic Party is not, never has been and never will be the "prochoice party." To say that it supports reproductive rights is itself a misleading characterization.
And of course, the prochoice movement trembles while it waits for the proverbial other shoe to drop: When will George W.
A sample of more than 200 prolife and prochoice activists in California was the source of these interviews.
Sullivan of Fargo, N.D., called on Roman Catholics to hold prochoice Catholic politicians accountable.
Contrary to the model suggested by new social movement discourse, I will show that the Canadian prochoice campaign dating from 1982 to the present has been pervasively and critically engaged with two levels of the Canadian state, the class structuring of abortion access and the importance of social class for political organizing.
At first scoffing at his suggestion that the "prochoice" rhetoric should be updated to tap into a more powerful moral frame, Williams then tempers her criticism, saying words do in fact matter.