procedural memory


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procedural memory

mental retention involving presemantic perception, processing visuospatial information, and affective valence, allowing recall of skills needed for ADLs. Compare: autobiographic memory.

pro·ce·du·ral mem·o·ry

(prǒ-sē'jŭr-al mem'ŏr-ē)
Knowledge needed to perform the procedures composing a given task.

procedural memory

The ability to recall how to perform activities or functions, e.g., how to brush one's teeth or ride a skateboard. This type of memory is often preserved when other memory functions are lost.
See: declarative memory
See also: memory
References in periodicals archive ?
The existence of a cognitive cycle, along with an appropriate procedural memory to drive it, has become definitional for a cognitive architecture.
At the time of trauma, the memory of the body state of the person is stored in the procedural memory. Also, the facts and events of trauma are stored in the declarative memory and as these data signify a threat or emotionally unresolved conflict, amygdala and related centres responsible for the evaluation of emotional content will be aroused.
Procedural memory seems to be quite well preserved in normal aging.
Animals call on procedural memory when performing simple tricks.
Likewise procedural memory is also future-oriented, as one follows the steps of a process moving forward to some end.
The role and resiliency of repetitive religious activities in regard to the neuropsychological losses of AD will relate to procedural memory and emotional attachments.
This latter observation proposes that tradition is largely related to automatic processes of nondeclarative, procedural memory, a position that is somewhat extreme (Rubin 1995, 136).
The model also explains the development of procedural memory which ultimately explains a wide variety of memory effects, higher order skills, and language learning.
Organizational cognition is explored in papers that address knowledge and the replication of technology, organizational routines as a form of procedural memory, culture and organizational learning, leadership as the management of meaning, and transaction theory.
As procedural memory is frequently preserved when cognitive dysfunction occurs, intervention plans should consider strategies based on this preserved function and should utilize compensatory procedures to address declarative deficits (e.g.
* Procedural memory, of the ability to remember how to reduce a fraction of divide a number by another number.
One of the strongest memory systems in the brain is procedural memory which involves the use of the body in learning.