procedural memory


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procedural memory

mental retention involving presemantic perception, processing visuospatial information, and affective valence, allowing recall of skills needed for ADLs. Compare: autobiographic memory.

pro·ce·du·ral mem·o·ry

(prǒ-sē'jŭr-al mem'ŏr-ē)
Knowledge needed to perform the procedures composing a given task.

procedural memory

The ability to recall how to perform activities or functions, e.g., how to brush one's teeth or ride a skateboard. This type of memory is often preserved when other memory functions are lost.
See: declarative memory
See also: memory
References in periodicals archive ?
The existence of a cognitive cycle, along with an appropriate procedural memory to drive it, has become definitional for a cognitive architecture.
Q], the corresponding episodic memory is added automatically into the procedural memory.
This body state and also all stimuli associated with the event that the person is not aware of, are stored in procedural memory.
Animals call on procedural memory when performing simple tricks.
Likewise procedural memory is also future-oriented, as one follows the steps of a process moving forward to some end.
Procedural memory abilities, often referred to as implicit memory, involve more rote or unconscious recollections (e.
The subsets of nondeclarative memory are conditioning, priming, and procedural memory.
Don't forget the importance of movement and role play for strengthening procedural memory and developing a healthier, more active student.
In both declarative and procedural memory, a selection is made on the basis of some evaluation, either activation or expected outcome.
Thus, their procedural memory was apparently not affected.
Working memory, the third area, is an area of short-term memory in which the productions from procedural memory and the generalizations from declarative memory are applied to the current task.
It's becoming increasingly clear that sleep is critical for consolidating procedural memory into a usable form," says neuroscientist Robert Stickgold of Harvard Medical School in Boston.