pachyderma

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pachyderma

 [pak″e-der´mah]
abnormal thickening of the skin. adj., adj pachyder´matous.
pachyderma circumscrip´tum (pachyderma laryn´gis) localized warty epithelial thickenings on the vocal cords.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pach·y·der·ma

(pak'ē-der'mă),
Abnormally thick skin.
See also: elephantiasis.
Synonym(s): pachydermatosis
[pachy- + G. derma, skin]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pachyderma

A nonspecific term for leathery subcutaneous induration due to an accumulation of inelastic connective tissue, as occurs in acromegaly, or due to accumulation of protein-rich mucin, collagen and fibroblasts, as occurs in myxoedema.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pach·y·der·ma

(pak'ē-dĕr'mă)
Abnormally thick skin.
See also: elephantiasis
[pachy- + G. derma, skin]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
emarginatus, Chamaesyce maculata, Onobrychis viciifolia, Proboscidea louisianica.
Pages 143-148 in The Proboscidea evolution and paleoecology of elephants and their relatives (J.
Genetic similarity between Boccardia proboscidea from Western North America and cultured abalone, Haliotis midae, in South Africa.
Mastodons are members of the extinct genus "Mammut" of the order Proboscidea and form the family Mammutidae; they resembled, but were distinct from, the woolly mammoth, which belongs to the family Elephantidae.
& FRASSINETTI, D., 2001.- The Pleistocene Gomphotheres (Proboscidea) from South America: diversity, habitats and feeding ecology.
If we do not "bring elephants back and offer them a chance for an evolving, deepening citizenship" in the current natural world, she says, "then Order Proboscidea will never again produce American endemics; the evolution of Order Proboscidea in the NewWorld will be over." For Barlow, that would be unconscionable and unimaginable--a terrible evil.
Botanically speaking, there are at least two distinct groups of martynias: the Ibicellae with thorny seed pods and the Proboscidea with smooth seed pods.