problem drinker

problem drinker

A person who drinks alcohol despite knowing that overuse causes physical, psychological and social problems, while the criteria for alcohol dependence are not met.

Problem drinker criteria 
• 5+ alcoholic drinks on any one occasion at least once/month—“heavy drinking” ;
• One or more alcohol-related social consequences—e.g., drink-driving, public drunkenness arrests, alcohol-related criminal arrests, traffic or other accidents when drinking, confrontations about alcohol-related health problems by a medical practitioner, alcohol-related family or on-the-job problems;
• One or more symptoms of alcohol dependence—e.g., having an alcoholic drink upon awakening, shaking hands, memory loss of events that occurred while drinking.

problem drinker

Substance abuse A person who meets 2 of the 3 criteria in the last 12 months, for alcoholics. See Alcohol, Binge drinking. Cf Social drinker.
Problem drinker  
5+ alcoholic drinks on any one occasion at least once/month–'heavy drinking'
One or more alcohol-related social consequences–eg, drunk-driving, public drunkenness arrests, alcohol-related criminal arrests, traffic or other accidents when drinking, confrontations about alcohol-related health problems by a medical practitioner, alcohol-related family or on-the-job problems
One or more symptoms of alcohol dependence–eg, having an alcoholic drink upon awakening–an 'eye-opener', shaking hands, awakening not remembering the events that occurred while drinking JAMA 1992; 268:1872oc 
References in periodicals archive ?
A PROBLEM drinker, who stole blocks of cheese from a town centre shop, has been jailed despite vowing to behave himself in the future.
He can only point to his 53 England goals and 253 for Manchester United and ask if a problem drinker could hold those records.
A problem drinker will drink and if the price of their favourite booze is increased they will find a way round the problem.
(66) Informed in part by models of behavior change (e.g., Stall and Biernacki's stages of spontaneous remission), (67) this literature often views desistance as stemming from an accumulation of drinking consequences that can prompt (1) deliberate reappraisals of one's drinking, followed by (2) self-identification as a problem drinker (i.e., problem recognition), and then (3) targeted efforts to change drinking habits.
1) The Problem Drinker's Health and Well-Being Are Greatly Diminished
None of the participants was a problem drinker. Indeed, 25% were nondrinkers, 32% drank alcohol infrequently, and 43% were light to moderate drinkers, meaning they consumed anywhere from three drinks per week to two drinks per day.
(17), (18) If your patient is a problem drinker, further assessment could determine if he or she has an alcohol use disorder.
Second, the proportion of DWI offenders who self-identify as a problem drinker will be compared against two separate, objective indicators of problem drinking.
The purpose of the present study was threefold: (1) to examine the prevalence of problem drinking among adolescents at an urban, private high school; (2) to identify frequencies of problems related to drinking; and (3) to identify parent and peer variables associated with being a problem drinker. Rather than merely defining problem drinking in terms of amount of alcohol consumed, this study examined the relationship between heavy drinking and engaging in other problematic behaviors.
* Family and friends can help an unmotivated problem drinker.
Corporate culture itself helps to blur the line between social drinker and problem drinker. Five-martini lunches may be passe, but drinking is still prominent, particularly in industries such as advertising, entertainment and hospitality, according to Fearing.
And the most important question: What approaches more effectively help the problem drinker move toward change?

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