proanthocyanidin

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proanthocyanidin

Any of the flavanol class of polyphenols found in apples, maritime pine bark and grape seed extracts, which is a more potent antioxidant than vitamins C or E and has been shown to reduce LDL-cholesterol.

proanthocyanidin

(prō-ăn″thō-sī-ăn′ĭ-dĭn)
A chemical in cranberry juice that is believed to inhibit the adhesion of Escherichia coli to the mucosa of the urinary tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ten proanthocyanidins including catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, catechin (4[alpha] [right arrow] 8) catechin, gallocatechin (4[alpha] [right arrow] 8) gallocatechin, gallocatechin (4[alpha] [right arrow] 8) epigallocatechin, gallocatechin (4[alpha] [right arrow] 8) catechin, catechin (4[alpha] [right arrow] 8) gallocatechin, gallocatechin (4[alpha] [right arrow] 8 ) epicatechin have been identified from MGEB.
Keywords: qRT-PCR; Structural genes; Falovonides; Anthocyanidin synthase; Proanthocyanidins
Cranberries also contain unique elements, called proanthocyanidins or PACs that cleanse and purify the body by preventing certain bacteria from sticking inside the body.
Proanthocyanidins are secondary metabolites of plants and researchers have indicated that proanthocyandins have high antioxidant and radical scavenging activity [49].
Cranberries contain a specific group of polyphenol molecules called proanthocyanidins. (21-23) Similar to FimH inhibitors, these molecules may prevent bacteria from sticking to urinary tract lining cells.
The researchers believe the ruby red pigments in tart cherry juice, known as proanthocyanidins, also play a role.
Proanthocyanidins, which belong to a class of flavonoid polyphenols, are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom.
Up to now, the most prominent phenolic antioxidant from tree bark is Pycnogenol, which is commercially extracted from French maritime pine Pinus pinaster and mainly composed of proanthocyanidins (from 65% to 75%).
Traditionally, the anti-bacterial activity of cranberries has been ascribed to a class of compounds called proanthocyanidins (PACs).
Cranberries (genus Vaccinium) have been used as a natural remedy for at least 100 years, and in the 1980s scientists discovered that the berries contain an active ingredient (possibly proanthocyanidins) that stops bacteria sticking to uro-epithelial cells.
Here food, nutrition, and crop scientists describe methods for detecting and measuring nine types of phytochemicals rich in antioxidants: phenolic acids, carotenoids, anthocyanins, ellagitannins, flavonols and flavones, proanthocyanidins, flavanones, phytosterols, and tocopherols and tocotrienols.
Cranberries contain proanthocyanidins, flavonoids and tannins.