prohormone

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prohormone

 [pro-hor´mōn]
a precursor of a hormone, such as a polypeptide that is cleaved to form a shorter polypeptide hormone or a steroid that is converted to an active hormone by peripheral metabolism. Called also prehormone.

pro·hor·mone

(prō-hōr'mōn),
1. An intraglandular precursor of a hormone; for example, proinsulin. Compare: prehormone.
2. Obsolete term formerly used to designate a substance developed in serum that antagonizes a specific antihormone, and thus enhances the action of the corresponding hormone.

prohormone

/pro·hor·mone/ (-hor´mōn) a hormone preprotein; a biosynthetic, usually intraglandular, hormone precursor, such as proinsulin.

prohormone

(prō-hôr′mōn′)
n.
An inactive compound that is converted by enzymes into a biologically active hormone.

pro·hor·mone

(prō-hōr'mōn)
An intraglandular precursor of a hormone, e.g., proinsulin.
Compare: prehormone, bioregulator

pro·hor·mone

(prō-hōr'mōn)
Intraglandular precursor of a hormone; e.g., proinsulin.

prohormone

a precursor of a hormone, such as a polypeptide that is cleaved to form a shorter polypeptide hormone, or a steroid that is converted to an active hormone by metabolism.
References in periodicals archive ?
The move prompted a group of pro-hormone makers to pay a lobbying visit to Hatch's Washington office to express their concerns.
Among the visitors were representatives from Weider Nutrition International, a leading pro-hormone producer in Utah which last year was fined $400,000 by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) for making false claims about some of its weight-loss products.
Most troubling has been the explosion in pro-hormones, a trend started with a muscle-building supplement, DHEA, a steroid hormone and chemical cousin of testosterone and estrogen.
Gary Wadler, a professor of medicine at New York University and a member of the World Anti-Doping Federation, says there's not much difference between the steroids and pro-hormones.
Hatch has expressed concerns that pro-hormones are being marketed to kids.
In the meantime, millions of Americans, including children, will be free to take the stuff, and the athletes who are in Salt Lake City next winter will likely find bottles of pro-hormones beckoning from store shelves.
Lichten is not alone in sounding the alarm regarding this crucial but underappreciated pro-hormone.
Voigt warn: "If one is tested for performance enhancing drugs (steroids), that person will test positive when using these pro-hormones.