privilege

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privilege

(prĭv′ĭ-lĭj) [L. privilegium, law affecting a single person, prerogative]
1. A right granted to a person in recognition of some special status, e.g., a right to practice one's profession in a health care facility.
2. An immunity from commonly imposed standards or laws.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of your very good relationship with Iowa State Bank & Trust Company, a $500 discretionary overdraft privilege has been placed on your account in accordance with our Discretionary OverDraft Privelege Policy, a copy of which is enclosed.
It was a special privelege for a student to study in an individual tutorial with Benardete, who gave of his time and ideas with unstinting generosity.
The Justice Department issued what it calls a Special Administrative Measure (SAM) in order to control Rahman's communication with the outside world and to undermine attorney-client privelege. Hence, while the government was allowed to build case against Rahman in the media, Rahman was forbidden to respond.
He was originally one of the Aircorps' high-flyers and had the privelege of piloting the Government jet with Taoiseach Bertie Ahern on board.
1984 Children of Privelege: Student Revolt in the Sixties
I do however see private cars using it on a regular basis as if they have some special privelege over the rest of us.
We also are grateful to IN.RE.NA.RE for allowing us the privelege to study birds in the Republic of Panama, and to STRI for logistical support.
Taking a page from the allegorical writing style of Derrick Bell, Robinson describes a fictional "great white" city called Privelege, where Vernon Jordan disease is rampant.
In fact, by 1639, Davenant obtained a patent from Charles I to build a theatre designed to "gather together, entertain, govern, privelege and keep, such and so many Players and Persons, to exercise Action, musical Presentments, Scenes, Dancing and the like."(51) Davenant's groundwork of novelties including song, dance, and spectacle made him a viable rival to Killigrew; as Judith Milhous explains, "All the adjuncts to a bare script--scenery, dance, music--had put the Duke's Company ahead and forced Killigrew to scramble to keep up."(52) The changes Davenant made in revising his Commonwealth piece The Siege of Rhodes to perform it on the Restoration stage reveal his interests and concerns in the early 1660s; James A.
Alexander, The Corporate Attorney-Client Privelege: A Study of the Participant, 63 St.
Peggy McIntosh, White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences Through Work in Women's Studies, in Power, Privelege and Law: A Civil Rights Reader 22-23 (Leslie Bender & Daan Braveman eds., 1995).
Litigation services engagements are particularly sensitive since the CPA may be working under counsel's work-product or attorney-client privelege, and an inadvertent disclosure might jeopardize that privilege and adversely affect the outcome.