privacy

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Related to Privacy rights: invasion of privacy

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
In the government's view, there is no need to ask whether the 2008 law violates Americans' privacy rights, because in this context Americans have no rights to be violated.
In addition to stripping workers' privacy rights, Sen.
Following debate on the use of closed-circuit security cameras in Iran, Majlis Deputy Kazem Jalali warned that the program may violate privacy rights and said any use of security cameras must be within existing privacy guidelines.
The ruling is hailed by supporters as a major step forward for privacy rights in electronic communications.
In any event, privacy rights would not confer immunity from the law.
Diane Swanson, associate professor of management, says that, in the case of HP, where its ex-chairwoman and four others face charges in a boardroom-news leak spying case, discovering the source of the leak should have been handled internally without violating the privacy rights of employees and the media.
President Lyndon Johnson and his allies in Congress had recently achieved a host of triumphs: the Civil Rights Act, Medicare and Medicaid, Food Stamps and Head Start, and the Voting Rights Act, with its principle of "one man, one vote." The liberal Warren Court was also issuing landmark decisions, including the Miranda ruling safeguarding rights of the accused, and the Griswold decision ensuring privacy rights.
John Poindexter, says the government should be able to obtain information to combat terrorism, but it should do more to ensure privacy rights are not violated.
Innovative argued that the CHR was entitled to view the record of the publicly funded services only, and to open the complete patient record would breach privacy rights under Alberta's Health Information Act.
It is arguing in court that it simply cannot be prosecuted for violating the privacy rights and First Amendment rights of Americans because of the "state secrets" privilege.
It highlights Illinois, where the governor set up a group devoted to setting up privacy rights protection policies.
In a statement on the Craigslist Web site, Buckmaster says the lawsuit, if successful, would "deal multiple blows to everyone's hard-won civil rights--by significantly reducing access to equal-opportunity housing, by undercutting our fundamental free-speech rights, and by intruding on important privacy rights."