patients' rights

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patients' rights

Those culturally and legally specified rights, claims, powers, privileges, and remedies due to a person receiving health care services. They include, but are not limited to, the following: 1. access to care; 2. aftercare assistance or aid; 3. an appeals process when one has a grievance; 4. choice in the selection of one's health care providers; 5. confidentiality and privacy; 6. freedom from discrimination; 7. information; 8. respectful treatment; 9. safety; 10. shared decision making; and11. respect for patient preferences and wishes.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

patients' rights

The entitlement of patients, especially those in hospital, to considerate and respectful care, to information about what is being done to them or what is proposed and to knowledge of the diagnosis and probable outlook (prognosis). Patients are especially entitled to all information necessary to enable them to give informed consent to any surgical operation or other form of treatment, especially if associated with risk. Patients have a right to refuse treatment and to be informed of the probable consequences. They are entitled to privacy and confidentiality over their medical details and may not be included in any form of medical trial or experiment without their full knowledge and consent. Patients may discharge themselves from hospital at any time, but may be required to sign a document to the effect that they understand the possible consequences.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"It is imperative that the right to privacy and confidentiality of all children involved must always be protected, not only by the school administrators, the parents, other parties concerned, the media, as well as users of social networks," it added.
[6] To bring the primary objective of creating awareness of the UDBHR in SA into effect, UNESCO's understanding of respect for the principle of privacy and confidentiality is explained briefly.
He said: "When we talk about information, we simultaneously take into account the privacy and confidentiality with no room for manipulation and unauthorised use.
"Nurses must recognize that it is paramount that they maintain patient privacy and confidentiality at all times, regardless of the mechanism that is being used to transmit the message, be it social networking or a simple conversation.
An organization's ability to identify, manage and control its resulting privacy and confidentiality risks will assist its development, but may also have a direct impact on the organization's value to its consumers shareholders, regulators and other ancillary stakeholders.
As the setting of computerized administration of questionnaires at schools is likely to be different from the administration of paper-and-pencil questionnaires, it is important to investigate respondents' perceived level of privacy and confidentiality as a possible source of response bias.
These concepts are integrally related, but it needs to be clearly understood that privacy and confidentiality are ethical concepts imperatively important in counseling relationships.
The ideas of privacy and confidentiality are not new to libraries.
The genesis of medical privacy and confidentiality is found in the Hippocratic Oath, which directs the physician not to reveal private patient information (Resier, Dyck, & Curran, 1977).
Privacy and confidentiality are in greater jeopardy than ever because of two security issues inherent in compliance with HIPAA regulations.
Percept is a security appliance from Cary, N.C.-based Covelight that polices critical Web-enabled applications with full-time usage surveillance to protect the integrity, privacy and confidentiality of enterprise information assets from abuse and misuse by the trusted "insider." The company says Percept "monitors, learns and records the actions of application users and provides real-time detection and notification of usage policy and security control violations and suspicious activity--all supported by an extensive forensic audit trail.
To better protect confidentiality, OHRP and IRBs should develop and implement "best practice" techniques to protect privacy and confidentiality. Flexibility should be allowed when researchers use microdata that already incorporate such techniques.