inertia

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Related to Principle of inertia: Newton's second law

inertia

 [in-er´shah] (L.)
inactivity; inability to move spontaneously.
colonic inertia weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
uterine inertia sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·er·ti·a

(in-er'she-ă, in-ĕr'shă),
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. Tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, inertia can not signify merely what bodies do not do, and the principle of inertia does not treat bodies as lacking an inherent principle or as entirely under the control of external forces.
Failure to recognize this point may mislead a thinker into maintaining that the principle of inertia denies inherent principles of nature.
The principle of inertia is opposed to many of Aristotle's specific conceptions of the natures of things.
Similarly, the principle of inertia should be distinguished from the mechanistic philosophical lens through which it is commonly viewed and within which it was formulated.

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