causality

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causality

 [kaw-zal´ĭ-te]
the relationship between cause and effect.

cau·sal·i·ty

(kawz'al-i-tē),
The relating of causes to the effects they produce; the pathogenesis of disease and epidemiology, are largely concerned with causality.

causality

[kôsal′itē]
(in research) a relationship between one phenomenon or event (A) and another (B) in which A precedes and causes B. The direction of influence and the nature of the effect are predictable and reproducible and may be empirically observed. Causality is difficult to prove. Some social scientists contend that it is impossible to prove a causal relationship.

cau·sal·i·ty

(kaw-zali-tē)
The relating of causes to the effects they produce; the pathogenesis of disease and epidemiology are largely concerned with causality.

locus of causality

(1) in attribution theory, a person's perception of whether the cause of their success or failure at a task is internal (due to personal factors, such as effort and ability) or external (due to external factors, such as luck or chance); (2) in self-determination theory, a person's perception of whether the origin of their reasons for engaging in a behaviour is internal (done willingly and out of free choice) or external (done because they are compelled or required to do so, either by external pressure from others or because of self-imposed pressures).

cau·sal·i·ty

(kaw-zali-tē)
The relating of causes to the effects they produce; the pathogenesis of disease and epidemiology are largely concerned with causality.

causality,

n a relationship between one event or action that precedes and initiates a second action or influences the direction, nature, or force of a second action. In scientific study, causality must be observable, predictable, and reproducible and thus is difficult to prove.

causality

the relationship between cause and effects.

principle of causality
the postulate that every phenomenon has a cause or causes, i.e. that events do not occur at random but in accordance with physical laws so that, in principle, causes can be found for each effect.

Patient discussion about causality

Q. how is depression caused by having cancer treated? I mean not only the patient, also the family members who tend to get depressed by the situation. how can you treat thi skind of depression?

A. thanks guys, you are great. Nice to have such a community here.

Q. What causes fibromyalgia? Is fibromyalgia a deadly disease?

A. The causes of fibromyalgia are not known. But there are many theories such as abnormalities in brain chemicals, infections, trauma, genetics and hormonal changes. Factors such as poor sleep, fatigue, overexertion and anxiety, may aggravate the symptoms. Fibromyalgia is not a progressive or life-threatening condition, but it affects quality of life. Fibromyalgia is only a disorder of muscles and not a disease.

Q. Is that true that mouth sores are caused by lack of vitamins? I’ve been having white mouth sores in the past 6 months or so. Could that mean I have to take vitamin supplements?

A. yup ... autoimmune reactions means your immune system is not working well
it's not working well because it lacks the nutrient and vitamins it needs to function properly
- take lots of vitamin c to boost your immune system
- organic multivitamins
- organic juices high in anti oxidants
- and most important .. omega 3-6-9

More discussions about causality
References in periodicals archive ?
Does the principle of causality entail that I focus on the vice and ignore the virtue?
The overarching lesson, though, is that the passive interpretation of the principle of causality cannot be the whole story about its proper application.
The active interpretation of the principle of causality
Let's now look at the reverse cases, those in which the principle of causality is interpreted as requiring active support of natural causal chains.
If that's what Boonin intends, he is right that Rand wouldn't endorse it, but that's because it violates the rights of third parties (something that violates the principle of causality in their case), not because the entrepreneur doesn't deserve some support.
The principle of causality does not entail forced imposition of rewards, and Rand has no objection to assisting the deserving but unlucky.
In this case, Boonin is right to say that Rand would reject forcible confiscation, so the question becomes whether the principle of causality really entails forced confiscation.
So the outcome in the Lucky Loafer case is accurately described as an application of the principle of causality if no confiscation takes place.
In that case, it would violate the principle of causality to take it away from him.
46) It also seems to me that the distinction between active and passive interpretations of the principle of causality is a red herring.

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