price war

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price war

An aggressive competition between two or more providers of goods or services, in which the price is lowered to a minimum, as a means of earning more money. The NHS has traditionally fixed prices between trusts, which has allowed quality of service to remain high. The NHS Operating Framework for 2011/2, aims to bring “…new flexibility being introduced opportunity for providers to offer services…” at less than the mandatory tariff prices.
References in periodicals archive ?
Customers don't necessarily want to see an all-out price war, particularly if the result is the radical reduction in the total number of players in the market or a drastic lowering of the standards for content and service.
Chemists are set to be drawn into the fierce High Street price war today when Asda introduces another round of cost-cutting, this time in cosmetics and toiletries.
He alleges that Sorpresa was forced to end the price war in February after losing some $40 million last year.
In keeping with the theory of price wars triggered by entry, entrant B&W's prices were lower than incumbent Liggett's throughout the price war.
On the flip side, however, brutal price wars prevail in domestic tobacco, RJR Nabisco's largest single operation.
Most lenders will tell you a price war has already begun.
After all, most price wars start by accident, through some apparently trivial misreading or misjudgment of market conditions.
The price wars, however, have resulted in product being diverted to other parts of the country and caused Kimberly-Clark to widen distribution faster than planned, according to sources.
Rather than focusing on profit, 46 percent fight price wars to gain volume and market share.
PRICE wars have helped drive down the cost of fuel for the fourth month in a row, meaning the cost of filling a hatchback has fallen more than PS5 since July.
We are at the beginning of all-out price wars as the big supermarkets struggle to compete with the big discount chains and changing consumer shopping habits, believes retail entrepreneur Peter O Toole.
David McCorquodale, of business group KPMG, said: "It's likely these price wars are here to stay.