fornication

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Related to Premarital intercourse: fornication

for·ni·ca·tion

(fōr'ni-kā'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with formication.
Sexual intercourse, especially between unmarried partners.
[L. fornicatio, an arched or vaulted basement (brothel)]

fornication

Coitus; sexual intercourse.

fornication

Coitus. Cf Formication.

for·ni·ca·tion

(fōr-ni-kā'shŭn)
Sexual intercourse between partners unmarried to each other.
[L. fornicatio, an arched or vaulted basement (brothel)]
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, the acceptance of female premarital intercourse by half of the females must be considered on the basis of liberal gender ideology.
The social basis of the males' disapproval of females' premarital intercourse lies in the continuity of patriarchal social structure which oppresses women's sexuality.
It is mostly males who disapprove of females' premarital intercourse. The research results reveal that females are more tolerant towards homosexuality.
(14.) Upchurch DM et al., Sociocultural contexts of time to first sex among Hispanic adolescents, Journal of Marriage and Family, 2001, 63(4): 1158-1169; Ford K and Norris AE, Urban Hispanic adolescents and young adults: relationship of acculturation to sexual behavior, Journal of Sex Research, 1993, 30(4):316-323; Norris AE and Ford K, Condom beliefs in urban, low income, African American and Hispanic youth, Health Education Quarterly, 1994, 21(1):39 53; and Slonim-Nevo V, First premarital intercourse among Mexican-American adolescent women: interpreting ethnic differences, Journal of Adolescent Research, 1992, 7(3):332-351.
And for all of their limitations, vital statistics relating to unwed motherhood indicate that premarital intercourse probably was increasing, and increasing rapidly, during the 1940s and 1950s.
Admittedly, it would be a mistake to equate the sexual revolution with the increasing prevalence of premarital intercourse. As the works of John D'Emilio, Estelle Freeman and Beth Bailey have shown, the commodification of sex, the heavy emphasis on sexual fulfillment, the "resexualization of women in popular and scholarly thought," and, correspondingly, the elimination--or, at least, the decline--of the double standard, proved to be important developments in the sexual revolution.
Although Kinsey's data shocked American readers--especially his claims that nearly half of women had premarital intercourse, sixty-two percent had masturbated, and a quarter of married women, at some point, had engaged in extramarital sex--Kinsey believed the big jump in female premarital intercourse took place between 1916 and 1930.
They indicate that Elaine Tyler May's assertion that the rate of "premarital sexual intercourse" was "stable from the 1920s, to the 1960s," and D'Emilio and Freeman's claim that from the 1920s the "incidence of (female) premarital intercourse ...