Prehn's sign


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Prehn's sign

(prānz, prēnz)
[D. T. Prehn, 20th-cent U.S. physician]
A decrease in scrotal pain with elevation of the testicle. It is a physical finding in patients with epididymitis and testicular torsion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The following patient characteristics were assessed: time between onset of pain and arrival at the ED, characteristics and localization of pain, and Prehn's sign (positive or negative).
To assess factors that help to distinguish between genital/paragenital infection and testicular torsion, simple and multiple binary logistic regression analyses were performed on the different laboratory parameters (CRP </> 3 ml/L, WBC </> 10.4 g/L, </> 4 WBC per field in urine, </> 4 Ec per field in urine), time between onset of pain and arrival in the ED, characteristics of pain, localization of pain, and Prehn's sign (positive or negative).
Thirty-three percent (14/42) of patients with testicular torsion had a positive Prehn's sign at presentation, 19.0% (8/42) had no cremaster reflex, and 54.7% (23/42) had a retained testis unilaterally.
A positive Prehn's sign was an independent predictor of testicular torsion, whereas color Doppler ultrasound was not [Table 3].
We demonstrated that no single factor can reliably predict the cause of an acute scrotum, but rather a combination of factors, including patient history (characteristics of pain, dysuria), clinical findings (fever, Prehn's sign), and laboratory tests (CRP and WBC in blood, WBC in urine).
The cremasteric reflex is usually intact and the Prehn's sign is positive.
A negative Prehn's sign, a high-riding testicle and loss of the cremasteric reflex might help in differentiation.