predator

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predator

(prĕd′ə-tər, -tôr′)
n.
An organism that lives by preying on other organisms.
Public safety See Sexual predator
Zoology An animal that preys upon and consumes other animals for its sustenance

predator

any animal that lives by preying on other animals from (usually) a lower TROPHIC LEVEL.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence an effort was made to estimate correlations between predator and prey populations particularly chewing pests (bollworms as prey) and their predators (seven spotted lady beetle and spiders) in Pakistan.
In a study titled "The Impact of Predators on Deer in the Southeast," David A.
Waterfowl habitat management revolves around creating habitats that are appealing to birds, and nothing is more appealing to ducks and geese than suitable habitat with few predators.
Arnold Schwarzenegger (Dutch) and Carl Weathers (Dillon) starred in the first movie in the series, which saw soldiers being hunted by a Predator in a Central American jungle.
With its mandible-bearing face, dreadlocks, cool armor, freaky tech and relentless drive to hunt, the Predator is one of sci-fi's most iconic monsters.
There are examples of success stories involving predators and invasive prey.
* Vertical stripes may help a zebra hide in grass especially from its main predator the lion.
The math describing such relationships, known as a power law, incorporates an exponent (power) to relate the change in one factor (predator biomass) to another (prey biomass).
The NHL trade deadline is March 2, but the Predators, who drafted both Franson and Santorelli, wanted to ease their return to Nashville by making the trade now.
It is suggested that exotic mesopredators have partly replaced the original top predators and mesopredators, and despite their drawbacks they continue the necessary ecological function of herbivore control.
Dr Simon Rundle, an academic at the University of Plymouth, added: "One of the most important findings in this study was that there appeared to be a genetic component to the snails' behaviour, with those animals whose grandparents had experienced fish predators in the wild showing the biggest response."