preceptor

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preceptor

 [pre-sep´ter]
a person who guides, tutors, and provides direction aimed at a specific performance.
employee preceptor in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting and supporting a new or transferred employee through a planned orientation to a specific clinical area.
student preceptor in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting and supporting learning experiences for a student.

preceptor

(prĭ-sĕp′tər, prē′sĕp′tər)
n.
1. A teacher; an instructor.
2. An expert or specialist, such as a physician, who gives practical experience and training to a student, especially of medicine or nursing.
3. The head of a preceptory.

pre′cep·to′ri·al (prē′sĕp-tôr′ē-əl) adj.
pre′cep·to′ri·al·ly adv.

preceptor

An instructor or specialist who teaches, counsels, and serves as a role model and supports the growth and development of an initiate in a particular discipline for a limited time, with the specific purpose of socialising the novice in a new role. Preceptors fill the same role as mentors, but for a more limited time frame.

pre·cep·tor

(prē'sep-tŏr)
An experienced nurse, physician, or other health care professional who guides and teaches those less experienced, including students; mentor.
References in periodicals archive ?
(30) Hannah Webster Foster, The Boarding School; or, Lessons of a Preceptress to her Pupils (Boston, 1798), pp.
Delaney was actively involved in the Daughters by at least the mid-1880s: on 13 October 1887, she was elected the Chief Grand Preceptress (head) of the state temple, and she was re-elected in 1888.
love of her schoolmates and kind preceptress" to find her place in the "cold uncharitable world" (9, 3).
Robinson through adjacent paragraphs, they also bestowed applause on Siddons' growing presence in elite circles--her many command performances, her multiple portrait sittings, and even her appointment in January 1783 as "reading preceptress to the two younger Princesses, by her Majesty's express command." (29) A typical paragraph from the London Chronicle of 4 January 1783 nicely illustrates this world in which theater, royalty, and fashion mix seamlessly: