pragmatism

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prag·ma·tism

(prag'mă-tizm),
A philosophy emphasizing practical applications and consequences of beliefs and theories, that the meaning of ideas or things is determined by the testability of the idea in real life.
[G. pragma (pragmat-), thing done]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

prag·ma·tism

(prag'mă-tizm)
A philosophy emphasizing practical applications and consequences of beliefs and theories; that the meaning of ideas or things is determined by the testability of the idea in real life.
[G. pragma (pragmat-), thing done]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pragmatism

1. Action determined by the need to respond to immediate necessity or to achieve a particular practical result, rather than by established policy or dogma.
2. The philosophic principle that the truth and meaning of an idea is entirely relative to its practical outcome.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(19) Wallace Stevens has been connected to the pragmatist tradition by Richard Poirier in The Renewal of Literature and elsewhere.
Other authors accuse Rorty of distorting the "social and political dimensions of the pragmatist tradition".
As you probably noticed, my title is ambiguous--deliberately so, because my purpose here is twofold: to teach legal theorists something of the pragmatist tradition in philosophy, its history, its character, and its content; and to suggest some of the ways in which the intellectual resources of that tradition can enhance our understanding of the law.
Bernstein's importance for the pragmatist tradition is not adequately appreciated, and Bacon's discussion should go some way toward remedying this.
Her theory of rights assigns a central role to community as the "context and condition of individuality and identity as well as rights," but she considers herself "to belong to the Pragmatist tradition" in view of her debt to George Herbert Mead and John Dewey (p.
recognized as part of the pragmatist tradition, whether they have been
Rorty was made to seem the 'interloper' who had 'distorted the meaning of the pragmatist tradition' (335).