Potter syndrome

(redirected from Potter sequence)
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Pot·ter syn·drome

(pot'ĕr),
renal agenesis with hypoplastic lungs and associated neonatal respiratory distress, hemodynamic instability, acidosis, cyanosis, edema, and characteristic (Potter) facies; death usually occurs from respiratory insufficiency, which develops before uremia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Potter syndrome

Potter phenotype Neonatology A complex of findings caused by prenatal renal failure and oligohydramnios; without the cushioning amniotic fluid, produced by the kidneys, the uterus presses directly on infant's face–see Potter's face–and limbs, which are held in abnormal positions or contractures; oligohydramnios also cause hypoplasia of lungs–which don't function properly at birth Pathogenesis Intrauterine renal defects–eg, bilateral renal agenesis–and ↓ amniotic fluid production; no kidneys, no amniotic fluid.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Pot·ter syn·drome

(pot'ĕr sin'drōm)
Renal agenesis with hypoplastic lungs and associated neonatal respiratory distress, hemodynamic instability, acidosis, cyanosis, edema, and characteristic (Potter) facies; death usually occurs from respiratory insufficiency, which develops before uremia.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Potter,

Edith L., U.S. perinatal pathologist, 1901–.
Potter classification of polycystic kidney
Potter disease - Synonym(s): Potter facies
Potter facies - characteristic facies seen in severe renal malformations. Synonym(s): Potter disease
Potter syndrome - renal agenesis, with hypoplastic lungs and associated neonatal respiratory distress.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Absence of fetal urine production is known to result in oligohydramnios and anhydramnios [1], causing fetal malformations described in Potter sequence including flattened facies, limb malformations, low set abnormal ears, and pulmonary hypoplasia.
While chapter four, which is devoted to Webb's discussion of the witch figure, includes a brief discussion of the witch in the Harry Potter sequence before turning to the main characters and texts under analysis (Sophie Hatter in Jones' Howls Moving Castle and Pratchett's Tiffany Aching Discworld novels), Webb does not return to the synthesis displayed in the introduction, instead drawing extended comparisons between each of the authors in dyadic arrangement.
Associated anomalies include cleft lip/palate, micrognathia, ear anomalies, micro-ophthalmia, lobulated tongue, and neonatal teeth (1) Most of these anomalies represent the Potter sequence which is thought to be due to severe oligohydramnios.