Pott's disease


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Pott's disease

 [pots]
tuberculosis of the spine, usually beginning as a tuberculous osteomyelitis of the vertebrae and progressing to damage of the intervertebral disks. If erosion continues unchecked, there is complete destruction of the affected vertebrae. Symptoms include stiffness of the back, pain on motion, prominence of the spinous process of certain vertebrae, and occasionally abscess formation, paralysis, and abdominal pain. Diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the affected bone. Treatment includes administration of antibacterial drugs such as isoniazid and streptomycin. Para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) may be used instead of streptomycin if streptomycin is contraindicated. Surgical fixation of the affected vertebrae (spinal fusion) may be required for correction of orthopedic deformities such as kyphosis that may occur as a result of Pott's disease.

Pott's disease

(pŏts)
n.
Tuberculosis of the spine, leading, if untreated, to destruction of the vertebral bones, curvature of the spine, and paraplegia.

Pott's disease

Pott's disease

Tuberculosis of the spine, with collapse of one or more vertebrae, so as to produce a sharp angulation and a hump-back. Also known as spinal caries. (Sir Percivall Pott, 1714–88, English surgeon).

TB spine

; tuberculous spondylitis; Pott's disease tuberculous (TB) infection of vertebral column; characterized by sharp spinal angulation (due to collapse of infected vertebra), with associated neurological symptoms (radiculopathy, due to compression of local nerve roots)
References in periodicals archive ?
This supports the theory that infection in Pott's disease originates in the pelvic organs and disseminates hematogenously via Batson's plexus to involve more superior areas of the spine in a watershed fashion.
Patients with Pott's disease present with restricted movements of the neck and pain at the back of the neck.
Images in clinical medicine: Pott's disease with paraparesis.
The most important amongst them is Pott's disease, or tuberculosis of the spine, which closely resembles vertebral hydatid disease.