zygapophysis

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zygapophysis

 [zi″gah-pof´ĭ-sis]
the articular process of a vertebra.

ar·tic·u·lar pro·cess

[TA]
one of the bilateral small flat projections on the surfaces of the arches of the vertebrae, at the point where the pedicles and laminae join, forming the zygapophysial joint surfaces.

zygapophysis

/zy·ga·poph·y·sis/ (zi″gah-pof´ĭ-sis) pl. zygapoph´yses   the articular process of a vertebra.

zygapophysis

(zĭg′ə-pŏf′ĭ-sĭs, zī′gə-)
n. pl. zygapophy·ses (-sēz′)
One of two usually paired processes of the neural arch of a vertebra that articulates with corresponding parts of adjacent vertebrae.

zyg′ap·o·phys′e·al, zyg′ap·o·phys′i·al (zĭg′ăp-ə-fĭz′ē-əl, zī′găp-) adj.

ar·tic·u·lar pro·cess

(ahr-tik'yū-lăr pros'es) [TA]
One of the bilateral small flat projections on the surfaces of the arches of the vertebae, at the point where the pedicles and laminae join, forming the zygapophysial joint surfaces.
Synonym(s): processus articularis [TA] , zygapophysis.

zygapophysis

any facets of vertebrae that articulate with each other - usually two anterior zygapophyses which articulate with two posterior zygapophyses of the vertebra. See VERTEBRAL COLUMN and Fig. 314 .

zygapophysis

the articular process of a vertebra.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of a zygosphene-zygantrum articulation in addition to the prezygapophysis and postzygapophysis is an exclusive character for the members of Eosauropterygia (Rieppel, 1994).
Delapparentia is the only taxon among the iguanodonts and basal ornithopods so that the height of the axial neural spine from the base of the postzygapophysis is clearly greater than half the length of the neural arch (Fig.
A similar blunt accessory process between the epipophysis and postzygapophysis is also present in Iguanodon (Norman, 1980) and Mantellisaurus (Norman, 1986, 1987), and poorly defined in Ouranosaurus (Taquet, 1976), whereas it is absent in Camptosaurus (Gilmore, 1909), Jinzhousaurus (Wang et al.