posterior spinal artery

(redirected from Posterior spinal arteries)

pos·te·ri·or spi·nal ar·ter·y

[TA]
origin, intracranial part of vertebral; distribution, medulla, spinal cord, and pia mater; anastomoses, spinal branches of intercostal arteries.
Synonym(s): arteria spinalis posterior [TA]

pos·te·ri·or spi·nal ar·te·ry

(pos-tēr'ē-ŏr spī'năl ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
Origin, intracranial part of vertebral; distribution, medulla, spinal cord, and pia mater; anastomoses, spinal branches of intercostal arteries.
Synonym(s): arteria spinalis posterior.

posterior spinal artery

The left and right posterior spinal arteries run separately along the dorsal surface of the spinal cord and supply blood to the dorsal half of the spinal cord. At the top of the spinal cord, the posterior spinal arteries are branches of the vertebral arteries; at each intervertebral foramen, radicular arteries anastomose with the posterior spinal arteries.
See also: artery
References in periodicals archive ?
After they surround the vertebral bodies, they split into small branches that supply the psoas muscle and the radicular medullary arteries which accompany the spinal nerve roots to split into anterior and posterior spinal arteries. After then, the arteries split into two branches.
This is probably due to the dual posterior spinal arteries (PSA) and the frequent anastomotic networks supplying the dorsal part of the spinal cord.
(1,6) Since the anterior and posterior spinal arteries closely approximate the vertebral bodies, discs and ligamentum flavum, (10) prolonged compression of these arteries from pathologies in these structures may also result in arterial compromise and formation of an infarct.
In general, the major extrinsic arteries of the spinal cord are the anterior and posterior spinal arteries, anterior and posterior radiculomedullary arteries and pial arteries.
The less significant posterior spinal arteries arise from the cerebral circulation, most notably the posterior inferior cerebellar arteries, as branches from the vertebral arteries.
The anterior and posterior spinal arteries supply blood to the spinal cord.[12] The posterior inferior cerebellar artery supplies blood to the medulla and the cerebellum.10 Symptoms associated with occlusion of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery vary and depend upon specific areas of brain injury.[7] Infarction of the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery produces vertigo, nystagmus, ataxia and persistent dizziness.[7] When there is occlusion of the lateral branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery the clinical picture includes unilateral clumsiness with gait and limb ataxia.

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