Portuguese oyster

Portuguese oyster

Crassostrea angulata, C. pipas.
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Portuguese oyster (Crassostrea angulata Lamarck), slipper cupped oyster (Crassostrea iredalei Faustino), and Sydney rock oyster (Saccostrea glomerate Gould).
Another important species is the Portuguese oyster [C.
Differentiation between populations of the Portuguese oyster, Crassostrea angulata (Lamark) and the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg), revealed by mtDNA RFLP analysis.
In addition to the oyster species sampled from Korea, total genomic DNA from four individuals of the Portuguese oyster Crassostrea angulata were also included in subsequent molecular analyses.
Differentiation between populations of the Portuguese oyster, Crassostrea angulata (Lamarck) and the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg), revealed by mtDNA RELP analysis.
Scientific name Author citation English name Cerastoderma edirfe (Linnaeus, 1758) Common edible cockle Cerastoderma glaucum (Bruguiere, 1789) Olive green cockle Crassostrea angulata (Lamark, 1819) Portuguese oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793) Pacific cupped oyster, Japanese oyster Ensis ensis (Linnaeus, 1758) Pod razor shell Ensis siliqua (Linnaeus, 1758) Sword razor shell Mytilus edulis (Linnaeus, 1758) Blue mussel Mytilus gallopro vincialis (Lamarck.
Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene sequence support an Asian origin for the Portuguese oyster Crassostrea angulata.
Evidence for the presence of the Portuguese oyster, Crassostrea angulata, in northern China.
The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and the Portuguese oyster (Crassostrea angulata) are so closely related that they were once considered the same species.
angulata, the Portuguese oyster, was named by Lamarck (1819) based on specimens collected from Europe.
edulis and the Portuguese oyster Crassostrea angulata were imported from Europe instead.
Icosahedral DNA virus caused the Portuguese oyster Crassostrea angulata Lamarck velar virus disease and hemocyte infection virus disease (HIV), extensive gill erosion corresponding with high mortalities.