porosity

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porosity

 [pŏ-ros´ĭ-te]
the condition of being porous; a pore.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

po·ros·i·ty

(pō-ros'i-tē),
1. Synonym(s): porosis
2. A perforation.
[G. poros, pore]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

po·ros·i·ty

(pōr-os'i-tē)
1. Synonym(s): porosis.
2. A perforation.
[G. poros, pore]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

po·ros·i·ty

(pōr-os'i-tē)
1. Synonym(s): porosis.
2. A perforation.
[G. poros, pore]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
and Li, G.: 2014, A continuum damage failure model for hydraulic fracturing of porous rocks. Int.
The highly fragmented lava then descends and starts to cool, trapping gas particles inside it to form porous rock.
Zhang, "4- Stress-induced permeability evolutions and erosion damage of porous rocks," in Porous Rock Fracture Mechanics, pp.
McTigue, "Thermoelastic response of fluid-saturated porous rock," Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol.
It is fully consumed while the biopolymer-water-mix is flow- ing through the porous rock.
The state sits on limestone, a porous rock that easily dissolves in water, with a layer of clay on top.
He cited tight gas--stuck in a very tight, impermeable formations--and shale gas--which is trapped in porous rock structures.
For this theory, a porous rock of porosity, [phi] is considered and the pore space is interconnected, representing Biot's medium.
We can inject the CO into the cavity left by using up the coal and we can also inject it into porous rock just above the coal seam.
It would involve capturing carbon dioxide emissions from the proposed 2Co Energy Don Valley Power Project at Stainforth, Doncaster, and transporting them via a buried pipeline to be permanently stored offshore within natural porous rock formations beneath the North Sea seabed.
Natural gas is found in porous rock reservoirs beneath the earth's surface; hydraulic fracturing releases this trapped gas.
In cases where other liquids don't move in, such as in the North Sea off The Netherlands, the porous rock layer that harbored the oil originally can collapse after extraction, causing slight amounts of land settling (known as "land subsidence") in the rock layer surfaces above, but typically no more than a few tenths of an inch per year.