population

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population

 [pop″u-la´shun]
1. the individuals collectively constituting a certain category or inhabiting a specified geographic area.
2. in genetics, a stable group of randomly interbreeding individuals.
3. in statistics, a theoretical concept used to describe an entire group or collection of units, finite or infinite; from it a sample can be drawn.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn),
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a particular class. Compare: sample.
[L. populus, a people, nation]

population

(pŏp′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. All of the people inhabiting a specified area.
b. The total number of such people.
2. The total number of inhabitants constituting a particular race, class, or group in a specified area.
3. The act or process of furnishing with inhabitants.
4. Ecology All the organisms that constitute a specific group or occur in a specified habitat.
5. Statistics The set of individuals, items, or data from which a statistical sample is taken. Also called universe.

population

EBM
A collection of subjects from which a sample is drawn for a study to obtain estimates for values that would be obtained if the entire population was studied.

population

Clinical research Universe A group of persons to be described or about which one wishes to generalize, assuming that the group is representative of an entire population. See Control population, Patient population Global village The aggregate of persons in a specified area. See Zero population growth.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn)
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a particular class.
Compare: sample (1)
[L. populus, a people, nation]

population

  1. the total number of the individuals of a particular species, race or form of animal or plant, inhabiting a particular locality or region.
  2. (in genetics) the total number of BREEDING INDIVIDUALS of a species in a particular location.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn)
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a class.
[L. populus, a people, nation]
References in classic literature ?
If her population was a billion, and was increasing twenty millions a year, in twenty-five years it would be a billion and a half--equal to the total population of the world in
But on May 1, 1976, had the reader been in the imperial city of Peking, with its then population of eleven millions, he would have witnessed a curious sight.
The units of that vast and varied population bought and learnt what had happened; there had been a fight and New York had hoisted the white flag.
At that time the police control of the large polyglot population of Staten Island had become very lax, and scarcely a household but had its rifle or pistols and ammunition.
The final count shows a slight increase in the share of Muslim and Hindu populations. However, Christian and Ahmadi populations registered a marginal decline.
According to the United Nations Population Division estimates, 30 percent of the populations of China and Australia will be older than sixty by 2050, while South Korea's figure is 36.9 percent.
government banned DDT in 1970, and bird populations started to rebound.
How do scientists know if the populations of certain owl species in the boreal forest are increasing or decreasing?
Constitution was being drafted, a debate broke out between states with large populations and those with smaller populations.
Handbook of Urban Health: Populations, Methods, and Practice
In many African countries and in small sub populations in developed countries, the rates of infection are alarmingly high.
The outcome of infection then depended on the sizes of the populations and whether they were able to maintain the pathogen alone.

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