popper

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popper

(pŏp′ər)
n.
Slang An ampoule of amyl nitrite or butyl nitrite, used illicitly to induce euphoria and enhance sexual stimulation.

popper

(pop′ĕr)
A slang term for any of several nitrites, esp. amyl nitrite, inhaled to induce vasodilation, dizziness, or giddiness as a drug of abuse.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Popperian terms, it is a tentative theory, but one which is defensible until such time as it may be refuted.
It speaks against Mosini's claim that F53 provides support to neoliberalism--for example, one may criticise Friedman's unfalsifiable predictions in his Newsweek and Business Week articles (Brady 1986) by appealing to Popperian lines in F53, such as the following: one hypothesis is superior to another if 'it is part of a more general theory that applies to a wider variety of phenomena, .
Thus, both Berlinean skepticism and Popperian uncertainty serve as antidotes to dogmatism and fanaticism, which are two great enemies of liberty in Vargas Llosa's worldview.
This--obviously a crude sketch--I would take to be a preliminary "Popperian" response to Hindess' question about the coherence of an account in which we test against observation statements which have a theoretical content.
These Popperian scientific deficiencies, especially regarding the scarce and non-existing role of idealization in science, has been summarized by Nowak that way:
The spiritual physiognomy is rather, a good opportunity for philosophical speculations, than an analysis topic based on a methodology able to guide itself following the presuppositions and guiding lines of the Popperian philosophy.
They are crucial to formulate bold hypotheses which consider multiple trajectories of precisely quantified processes with rigid explicit criteria of Popperian falsification.
On the other hand, I strongly suspect, as others did, (21) that the essence of this shift perhaps has always largely been the healthy Popperian falsification.
In his influential book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (Kuhn, 1962), Thomas Kuhn (1922-1996) challenged the Popperian ideal of science as essentially concerned with logically falsifying predictions of theories.
Brian looked at past paradigm shifts and eventual recognition of neglected contributions that represent self-correction, and I was delighted to hear him challenge one of the current paradigms, the Popperian notion of falsifiability.
Hypothesis testing relies on a principle often referred to as "Popperian falsification" Early twentieth-century philosopher Karl Popper held that inferential statistics cannot prove anything with absolute certainty.